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Songs of a wayfarer

Word count: 465

Song Cycle by Gustav Mahler (1860 - 1911)

Original language: Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen

1. When my darling has her wedding-day

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
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When my darling has her wedding-day,
her joyous wedding-day,
I will have my day of mourning!
I will go to my little room,
my dark little room,
and weep, weep for my darling,
for my dear darling!

Blue flower! Do not wither!
Sweet little bird - you sing on the green heath!
Alas, how can the world be so fair?
Chirp! Chirp!
Do not sing; do not bloom!
Spring is over.
All singing must now be done.
At night when I go to sleep,
I think of my sorrow,
of my sorrow!


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2. I walked across the fields this morning

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
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 I walked across the fields this morning;
 dew still hung on every blade of grass.
 The merry finch spoke to me:
 "Hey! Isn't it? Good morning! Isn't it?
 You! Isn't it becoming a fine world?
 Chirp! Chirp! Fair and sharp!
 How the world delights me!"
 
 Also, the bluebells in the field
 merrily with good spirits
 tolled out to me with bells (ding, ding)
 their morning greeting:
 "Isn't it becoming a fine world?
 Ding, ding! Fair thing!
 How the world delights me!"
 
 And then, in the sunshine,
 the world suddenly began to glitter;
 everything gained sound and color
 in the sunshine!
 Flower and bird, great and small!
 "Good day, is it not a fine world?
 Hey, isn't it? A fair world?"
 
 Now will my happiness also begin?
 No, no - the happiness I mean
 can never bloom!


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

3. I have a red-hot knife

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



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I have a red-hot knife,
a knife in my breast.
O woe! It cuts so deeply
into every joy and delight.
Alas, what an evil guest it is!
Never does it rest or relax,
not by day or by night, when I would sleep.
O woe!

When I gaze up into the sky
I see two blue eyes there.
O woe! When I walk in the yellow field,
I see from afar her blond hair
waving in the wind.
O woe!

When I start from a dream
and hear the tinkle of her silvery laugh,
O woe!
Would that I lay on my black bier -
Would that I could never again open my eyes!


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

4. The two blue eyes of my darling

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



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 The two blue eyes of my darling -
 they have sent me into the wide world.
 I had to take my leave of this well-beloved place!
 O blue eyes, why did you gaze on me?
 Now I will have eternal sorrow and grief.
 
 I went out into the quiet night
 well across the dark heath.
 To me no one bade farewell.
 Farewell! My companions are love and sorrow!

 On the road there stands a linden tree,
 and there for the first time I found rest in sleep!
 Under the linden tree 
 that snowed its blossoms onto me -
 I did not know how life went on,
 and all was well again!
 All! All, love and sorrow
 and world and dream!


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

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