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Thompson-liederen

Word count: 458

Song Cycle by Jan van Amerongen (b. 1938)

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1. In the Mediterranean [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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Lovely wings of gold and green
Flit about the sounds I hear,
On my window when I lean
To the shadows cool and clear.

Roaming, I am listening still,
Bending, listening overlong,
In my soul a steadier will,
In my heart a newer song.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. My soul is dark [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Translation(s): DAN DUT FRE FRE GER GER GER GER GER GER NYN RUS

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


My soul is dark - Oh! quickly string
  The harp I yet can brook to hear;
And let thy gentle fingers fling
  Its melting murmurs o'er mine ear. --
If in this heart a hope be dear,
  That sound shall charm it forth again --
If in these eyes there lurk a tear, 
  'Twill flow -- and cease to burn my brain --

But bid the strain be wild and deep,
  Nor let thy notes of joy be first:
I tell thee -- Minstrel! I must weep,
  Or else this heavy heart will burst --
For it hath been by sorrow nurst,
  And ached in sleepless silence [long]1 --
And now 'tis doom'd to know the worst,
  And break at once -- or yield to song.


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1 in some versions, "too long"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. Travelling by night

Language: English

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[--- This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. ---]

4. The arrow and the song [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Translation(s): GER SPA

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I shot an Arrow into the air
It fell to earth I [knew]1 not where,
For so swiftly it flew, the sight
Could not follow it in its flight.

I breath'd a Song into the air
It fell to earth, I [knew]1 not where.
For who has sight so keen and strong
That it can follow the flight of a song?

Long, long afterward in an oak
I found the Arrow still unbroke;
And the Song from begining to end
I found again in the heart of a friend.


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1 Balfe, Emery: "know"

Note: parodied in the anonymous poem I stuck a pin into a chair.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

5. Stanzas for music [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Translation(s): DAN DUT FRE GER GER GER ITA RUS

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • DUT Dutch (Nederlands) [singable] (Lau Kanen) , copyright © 2017, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FRE French (Français) (Alexis Paulin Pâris) , "Stances à mettre en musique"
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Ferdinando Albeggiani) , "Fra tutte le più belle", copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


There be none of Beauty's daughters
  With a magic like thee;
And like music on the waters
  Is thy sweet voice to me:
When, as if its sound were causing
The [charmèd]1 ocean's pausing,
The waves lie still and gleaming,
And the lull'd winds seem dreaming:

And the midnight moon is weaving
  Her bright chain o'er the deep;
Whose breast is gently heaving
  As an infant's asleep:
So the spirit bows before thee,
To listen and adore thee;
With a full but soft emotion,
Like the swell of Summer's ocean.


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1 Mendelssohn: "charm'd"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

6. The child musician [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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He had played for his lordship's levee,
He had played for her ladyship's whim,
Till the poor little head was heavy,
And the poor little brain would swim.

And the face grew peaked and eerie,
And the large eyes strange and bright,
And they said -- too late -- "He is weary!
He shall rest for, at least, To-night!"

But at dawn, when the birds were waking,
As they watched in the silent room,
With the sound of a strained cord breaking,
A something snapped in the gloom.

'T was a string of his violoncello,
And they heard him stir in his bed: --
"Make room for a tired little fellow,
Kind God! --" was the last that he said.


Submitted by Sharon Krebs [Guest Editor]

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