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Four Songs [for soprano]

Word count: 197

Song Cycle by William Martin Yeates Hurlstone (1876 - 1906)

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1. Cradle song

Language: English

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[--- This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. ---]

2. Thou hast left me ever, Jamie [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: Scottish (Scots)

Translation(s): GER GER

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


Thou hast left me ever, Jamie,
Thou hast left me ever:
Aften hast thou vow'd that Death
Only should us sever;
Now thou'st left thy lass for aye-
I maun see thee never, Jamie,
I'll see thee never.

Thou hast me forsaken, Jamie,
Thou hast me forsaken;
Thou canst love another jo,
While my heart is breaking;
Soon my weary een I'll close,
Never mair to waken, Jamie,
Never mair to waken!


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. My true love hath my heart [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE

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My true love hath my heart and I have his.
By just exchange, one [for]1 the other given:
I hold his dear, and mine he cannot miss;
There never was a [bargain better]2 driven[.]3
His heart in me keeps [me and him]4 in one;
My heart in him his thoughts and senses guides:
He loves my heart, for once it was his own;
I cherish his because in me it bides[.]3
His heart his wound received from my sight;
My heart was wounded with his wounded heart;
For as from me on him his hurt did light,
So still, methought, in me his hurt did smart:
Both equal hurt, in this change sought our bliss,
My true love hath my heart and I have his.


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Parodied in Archibald Stodart-Walker's My true friend hath my hat.

1 Foote: "to"
2 Foote, Gounod, Wilkinson: "better bargain"
3 Foote: ":/ My true love hath my heart and I have his." (first line is repeated)
4 Foote: "him and me"

Submitted by Ted Perry

4. A croon

Language: Scottish (Scots)

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[--- This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. ---]

Titled "A lullaby" in Popular Rhymes of Scotland, ed by R. Chambers, Edinburgh & London, 1841.


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