The LiederNet Archive
WARNING. Not all the material on this website is in the public domain.
It is illegal to copy and distribute our copyright-protected material without permission.
For more information, contact us at the following address:
licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net

We Happy Few

Word count: 827

Song Cycle by Richard Jackson Cumming (b. 1928)

Show the texts alone (bare mode).

1. The Feast of Crispian [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE

List of language codes

Authorship


See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


WESTMORELAND.
[ O that we now had here
 But one ten thousand of those men in England
 That do no work to-day!]1

KING (Henry V).
[ What's he that wishes so?
 My cousin Westmoreland? No, my fair cousin.
 If we are marked to die, we are enough
 To do our country loss; and if to live,
 The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
 God's will! I pray thee, wish not one man more.
 By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,
 Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost;
 It yearns me not if men my garments wear;
 Such outward things dwell not in my desires;
 But if it be a sin to covet honour,
 I am the most offending soul alive.
 No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from England.
 God's peace! I would not lose so great an honour
 As one man more, methinks, would share from me
 For the best hope I have. O, do not wish one more!
 Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host,
 That he which hath no stomach to this fight,
 Let him depart. His passport shall be made,
 And crowns for convoy put into his purse.
 We would not die in that man's company
 That fears his fellowship to die with us.]1
 This day is call'd the feast of Crispian.
 He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
 Will stand a tip-toe when this day is named,
 And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
 He that shall live this day, and see old age,
 Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
 And say, "To-morrow is Saint Crispian."
 Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars,
 And say, "These wounds I had on Crispian's day."
 Old men forget; yet all shall be forgot,
 But he'll remember [with advantages]1
 What feats he did that day. [Then shall our names,
 Familiar in his mouth as household words,
 Harry the King, Bedford, and Exeter,
 Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester,
 Be in their flowing cups freshly rememb'red.]1
 This story shall the good man teach his son;
 And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
 [From this day to the ending of the world,]1
 But we in it shall be remembered,
 We few, we happy few, we band of brothers.
 For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
 Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
 This day shall gentle his condition;
 And gentlemen in England now a-bed
 Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here,
 And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
 That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.

SALISBURY
 [My sovereign lord, bestow yourself with speed:
 The French are bravely in their battles set,
 And will with all expedience charge on us.]1

KING (Henry V).
 [All things are ready, if our minds be so.]1


View original text (without footnotes)
1 omitted by Cumming.

Submitted by Barbara Miller

2. To whom can i speak today?

Language: English

Authorship

  • by Anonymous / Unidentified Author, Egyptian, c3000 BCE

Go to the single-text view


[--- This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. ---]

3. Fife tune

Language: English

Authorship


See other settings of this text.


One morning in May
 . . . . . . . . . .

[--- The rest of this text is not
currently in the database but will be
added as soon as we obtain it. ---]

This text may be protected by copyright under Canadian copyright law, so we will not display it until we obtain permission to do so or discover it is public-domain.

4. Here dead we lie [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Authorship


See other settings of this text.


Here dead we lie because we did not choose
  To live and shame the land from which we sprung.
Life, to be sure, is nothing much to lose,
  But young men think it is, and we were young.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

5. A ballad of good Lord Nelson

Language: English

Authorship

Go to the single-text view


[--- This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. ---]

This text may be protected by copyright under Canadian copyright law, so we will not display it until we obtain permission to do so or discover it is public-domain.

6. Going to the warres [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Authorship

See other settings of this text.


Tell me not, sweet, I am unkind,
That from the nunnery
Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind
To war and arms I fly.

True, a new mistress now I chase,
The first foe in the field;
And with a stronger faith embrace
A sword, a horse, a shield.

Yet this inconstancy is such
As you too shall adore;
I could not love thee, dear, so much,
Lov'd I not honour more.


Submitted by Ted Perry

7. A sight in camp [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Authorship


See other settings of this text.


A sight in camp in the daybreak grey and dim,
As from my tent I emerge so early, sleepless,
As slow I walk in the cool fresh air
the path near by the hospital tent,
Three forms I see on stretchers lying,
brought out there untended lying,
Over each the blanket spread,
ample brownish woollen blanket,
Grey and heavy blanket, folding, covering all.
Curious I halt and silent stand,
Then with light fingers I
from the face of the nearest,
the first, just lift the blanket;
Who are you, elderly man so gaunt and grim,
with well-grey'd hair, and flesh all sunken about the eyes?
Who are you my dear comrade?
Then to the second I step -
and who are you my child and darling?
Who are you sweet boy with cheeks yet blooming?
Then to the third - a face nor child nor old,
very calm, as of beautiful yellow-white ivory;
Young man I think I know you -
I think this face is the face of Christ Himself,
Dead and divine and brother of all,
and here again He lies.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

8. The end of the world

Language: English

Authorship

See other settings of this text.


[--- This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. ---]

This text may be protected by copyright under Canadian copyright law, so we will not display it until we obtain permission to do so or discover it is public-domain.

9. Grave hour [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship


Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Rainer Maria Rilke (1875 - 1926), "Ernste Stunde", appears in Das Buch der Bilder, first published 1906 FRE FRE
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Henk Badings, Max Kowalski, Arturo Milesi, Léon Orthel, Meinrad Schütter. Go to the text.

See other settings of this text.


Who now weeps anywhere in the world
 [ ... ]
















This text may be protected by copyright under Canadian copyright law, so we will not display it until we obtain permission to do so or discover it is public-domain.

10. The song of Moses

Language: English

Authorship

Go to the single-text view


[--- This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. ---]

Gentle Reminder
This website began in 1995 as a personal project, and I have been working on it full-time without a salary since 2008. Our research has never had any government or institutional funding, so if you found the information here useful, please consider making a donation. Your gift is greatly appreciated.
     - Emily Ezust

Browse imslp.org (Petrucci Music Library) for Lieder or choral works