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Day, Evening, Night, Morning

Word count: 247

Song Cycle by Henry Dixon Cowell (1897 - 1965)

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1. Day [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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The gray dawn on the mountain top
   Is slow to pass away.
Still lays him by in sluggish dreams,
   The golden God of day.

And then a light along the hills,
   Your laughter silvery gay;
The Sun God wakes, a bluebird trills,
You come and it is day.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Evening [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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The moon begins her stately ride
  Across the summer sky;
The happy wavelets lash the shore, -- 
  The tide is rising high.

Beneath some friendly blade of grass
  The lazy beetle cowers;
The coffers of the air are filled
  With offerings from the flowers.

And slowly buzzing o'er my head
  A swallow wings her flight;
I hear the weary plowman sing
  As falls the restful night.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. Night [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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Silence, and whirling worlds afar
  Through all encircling skies.
What floods come o'er the spirit's bar,
  What wondrous thoughts arise.

The earth, a mantle falls away,
  And, winged, we leave the sod;
Where shines in its eternal sway
  The majesty of God.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. Morning [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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The mist has left the greening plain,
The dew-drops shine like fairy rain,
The coquette rose awakes again
   Her lovely self adorning.
The Wind is hiding in the trees,
A sighing, soothing, laughing tease,
Until the rose says "Kiss me, please,"
'Tis morning, 'tis morning.

With staff in hand and careless-free,
The wanderer fares right jauntily,
For towns and houses are, thinks he,
   For scorning, for scorning.
My soul is swift upon the wing,
And in its deeps a song I bring;
Come, Love, and we together sing,
   "'Tis morning, 'tis morning."


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

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