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Six poems from the songbook of a painter

Word count: 925

Song Cycle by Robert Schumann (1810 - 1856)

Original language: Sechs Gedichte aus dem Liederbuch eines Malers

1. Sundays on the Rhine

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Robert Reinick (1805 - 1852), "Sonntags am Rhein", appears in Lieder, in Stimmungen und Gestalten, first published 1844 CAT DUT FRE
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Felix Draeseke, Philipp Lewalter, Johannes Pache, Joseph Rheinberger, Jakob Rosenhain, Robert Schumann, Wenzel Heinrich Veit, Georg Vierling, Heinrich Weiss. Go to the text.

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On Sundays in the morning hours,
how pleasant it is to wander
along the Rhine, when all around
the morning bells are chiming!

A little ship floats by on the blue water,
with singing and jubilation on board;
You little ship, say, isn't it good to travel
with such merriment?

From the village echoes the tones of the organ,
intoning its pious song;
Devoutly there the procession
moves out from the chapel.

And solemnly in all its splendor
the castle gazes down
and speaks of the good old days
when it was built upon the cliff.

All of this the splendid Rhine hoards
upon its viny shore,
and in the bright sunshine it reflects
the whole of our fatherland...

the pious, true fatherland
in all its full glory,
with joy and songs all around,
contemplated by beloved God.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

2. Serenade

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Robert Reinick (1805 - 1852), "Komm in die stille Nacht!", appears in Lieder, in Frühling und Liebe, first published 1844 CAT DUT FRE ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Valentin Eduard Becker, Georg Bradsky, Otto Dorn, Karl Anton Florian Eckert, Robert Kahn, Friedrich [Fritz] Kirchner, Eduard Lassen, Alphonse Maurice, Emil Nauwerk, Karl Gottlieb Reissiger, W. Rose, Carl Schultz, Robert Schumann, Hugo Wolf, Johann Baptist Zerlett, Paul Zilcher. Go to the text.

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 Come to me in the silent night!
 My dear, what makes you hesitate? 
 The sun has long since gone to rest,
 the world has closed its eyes,
 around us only Love is awake!

 My dear, what makes you hesitate?
 Already the stars are bright,
 Already the moon is in its place,
 hurrying quickly, so quickly!
 My dear, ah my dear, you must also therefore hurry!

[ ... ]
Love alone is awake, calling to you above all others. Hear the nightingale, hear my voice's call; my dear, o come to me in the silent night!

IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

3. Nothing more lovely

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Robert Reinick (1805 - 1852), "Nichts Schöneres", appears in Lieder, in Frühling und Liebe, first published 1844 CAT DUT FRE
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, Prince Consort, Wenzel Theodor Bradsky, Victor Hollaender, Franz Joetze, Heinrich August Marschner, Robert Schumann, Louis [Ludwig] Spohr. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


When I first beheld you,
how lovely you were, how fair,
I thought it would never happen in all my days
to see something lovelier
than your dear eyes
as I gazed into them for eternity.

I gazed at them so long,
until you became my bride;
and again I thought it would never happen
that I could see something lovelier
than your red mouth,
as I kissed them all the hour.

I kissed them so long,
until you were my wife;
and now I can be certain
that there can be nothing lovelier
than my lovely wife
in body and soul.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

4. To sunshine

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Robert Reinick (1805 - 1852), "An den Sonnenschein", appears in Lieder, in Frühling und Liebe, first published 1844 CAT DUT FRE
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): E. Brandmüller, C. Cramer, Frederick Delius, H. Gantenberg, Emil Hartmann, Otto Adolf Klauwell, Heinrich August Marschner, James P. Prior, Friedrich Reichel, Friedrich August Reissiger, Hans Michael Schletterer, Robert Schumann, Albert Ulrich. Go to the text.

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 O sunshine, o sunshine!
 How you shine into my heart,
 awakening in it such a pure joy in love
 that my chest soon feels too narrow!

 And narrow grows my room and house,
 and when I run out to the gate,
 I see you tempt to the fresh green
 even the fairest maidens!

 O sunshine, do you well believe
 that I should do just as you do,
 and kiss each attractive flower,
 that blooms just for you?

 You have watched the world for a long time
 and you know that, for me, that is not right;
 why then do you cause me such pain?
 O sunshine, o sunshine!


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

5. The poet's recovery

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on

Go to the single-text view


And again I had thought of that loveliest of women,
whom I have only seen before in dreams;
it drove me outside into the bright night,
and I had to walk through the silent grounds.
Suddenly 
the valley shone,
eerily as if it were a hall of ghosts.

There rushed together like a dance melody
the streaming wind, with a clangor and a hiss;
it blew in a hasty procession
from the cliffs and valleys, from the waves and the bushes,
and in the moonlight, 
there was a white wreath
where the elves were dancing a round dance.

And in the middle of their circle was a light, airy woman,
who was their queen, and I heard them singing:
"Leave this heavy earthly body,
leave these foolish earthly things!
Only in moonlight 
is Life itself!
Only in floating dreams is eternal existence!

I am she whom you often see in dreams;
I am she, the beloved of whom you often sing;
I am she, the queen of the elves.
You wanted to see me: your wish has been granted.
Now you shall be mine 
for eternity.
Come, come with me in the Elven Order!"

Already approaching, already flying around me,
the morning breeze is blowing and I am recovering.
Go away now, you elven queen;
now I will choose a different love -
one without lies and pretence, 
with a pure heart;
certainly there is one to be found for me.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

6. Message of love

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on

Go to the single-text view


Clouds that hurry toward the East,
where the one who's mine is waiting,
all my wishes, my hopes and songs
shall fly with you on your wings,
shall steer you, 
hurrying ones, to her
so that my chaste love
shall think of me with loyal love.

Sing morning dreams to her still,
float gently in the garden,
sink like dew into the shadowy room,
strew pearls upon the flowers and trees
so that to that wonderful being, 
if she passes by,
all the merry blossoms
shall open with even brighter splendor.

[ ... ]
And in the evening, in the silent calm, spread the sinking sun's light upon her! It shall paint you purple and gold; And in the sea, bright with glow and sunbeams, the little ship plies its way, so that she believes singing angels are preserving her. Yes, it may well be angels, if my heart were pure like hers; All my wishes, my hopes and songs are drawn there on your wings, are steered there by you, hurrying ones, to my chaste love, so that I alone may think of her.

Translation of title "Liebesbotschaft" = "Message of love"

IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

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