The LiederNet Archive
WARNING. Not all the material on this website is in the public domain.
It is illegal to copy and distribute our copyright-protected material without permission.
For more information, contact us at the following address:
licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net

Quiet Airs

Word count: 778

Song Cycle by Ernst Bacon (1898 - 1990)

Show the texts alone (bare mode).

1. Twilight [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Authorship


Go to the single-text view


The stately tragedy of dusk
      Drew to its perfect close,
The virginal white evening star
      Sank, and the red moon rose.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Gentle greeting [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Authorship


See other settings of this text.


I know not how it falls on me, 
This summer evening, hushed and lone; 
Yet the faint wind comes soothingly 
With something of an olden tone.

Forgive me if I've shunned so long 
Your gentle greeting, earth and air! 
But sorrow withers [e'en]1 the strong, 
And who can fight against despair?


View original text (without footnotes)
1 Bacon: "even"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. The divine ship [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Authorship


See other settings of this text.


One thought ever at the fore -
That in the Divine Ship, the World, breasting Time and Space,
All Peoples of the globe together sail, sail the same voyage,
Are bound to the same destination.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. Of love [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Authorship


See other settings of this text.


How love came in I do not know,
Whether by the eye, or ear, or no;
Or whether with the soul it came
(At first) infused with the same;
Whether in part 'tis here or there,
Or, like the soul, whole everywhere,
This troubles me: but I as well
As any other this can tell:
  That when from hence she does depart
  The outlet then is from the heart.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

5. Eden [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE ITA

List of language codes

Authorship


See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Ferdinando Albeggiani) , copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Come slowly, Eden!
Lips unused to thee,
Bashful, sip thy jasmines,
As the fainting bee,

Reaching late his flower,
Round her chamber hums,
Counts his nectars - enters,
And is lost in balms!


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

6. The little stone [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE GER ITA

List of language codes

Authorship


See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , copyright © 2017, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) (Bertram Kottmann) , copyright © 2018, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Ferdinando Albeggiani) , copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


How happy is the little stone
That rambles in the road alone,
And doesn't care about careers,
And exigencies never fears;
Whose coat of elemental brown
A passing universe put on;
And independent as the sun,
Associates or glows alone,
Fulfilling absolute decree
In casual simplicity.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

7. Fond affection [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Authorship


Go to the single-text view


The world's so wide I cannot cross it, 
The sea's so deep I cannot wade, 
I'll just go hire me a little boatman 
To row me across the stormy tide. 

I give you back your ring and letters, 
And the picture I have loved so well 
And henceforth we will meet as strangers, 
But I can never say farewell. 

There's only three things that I could wish for, 
That is, my coffin, shroud and grave, 
And when I'm dead, oh please don't weep o'er me 
Or kiss the lips you once betrayed.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

8. Stars [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Authorship


See other settings of this text.


Stars, I have seen them fall,
  But when they drop and die
No star is lost at all
  From all the star-sown sky.
The toil of all that be
  Helps not the primal fault;
It rains into the sea,
  And still the sea is salt.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

9. The heart [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE GER GER

List of language codes

Authorship


See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , "Le Cœur réclame le Plaisir - d'abord", copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) (Walter A. Aue) , copyright © 2010, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) (Bertram Kottmann) , copyright © 2014, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


The heart asks pleasure - first,
And then excuse from pain.
And then those little anodynes
That deaden suffering.

And then, to go to sleep;
And then, if it should be
The will of its Inquisitor,
The liberty to die.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

10. Song of snow-white heads [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English after the Chinese (中文)

Authorship


Based on

Go to the single-text view


Our love was pure
As the snow on the mountains:
White as a moon
Between the clouds --
They're telling me
Your thoughts are double
That's why I've come
To break it off.
To-day we'll drink
A cup of wine.
To-morrow we'll part
Beside the Canal:
Walking about
Beside the Canal,
Where its branches divide
East and west.
Alas and alas,
And again alas.
So must a girl
Cry when she's married,
If she find not a man
Of single heart,
Who will not leave her
Till her hair is white.


Confirmed with A Hundred and Seventy Chinese Poems, Translated by Arthur Waley, London, Constable and Company Ltd., 1918, pages 50-51.

Note: the poem is preceded by this explanation:

Ssŭ-ma Hsiang-ju was a young poet who had lost his position at court owing to ill-health. One day Cho Wēn-chün, a rich man’s daughter, heard him singing at a feast given by her father. She eloped with him that night, and they set up a wine-shop together. After a time Hsiang-ju became famous as a poet, but his character was marred by love of money. He sold love-poems, which the ladies of the palace sent to the emperor in order to win his favour. Finally, he gave presents to the "ladies of Mo-ling," hoping to secure a concubine. It was this step that induced his mistress, Cho Wēn-chün, to write the following poem.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

11. The lamb [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): CAT FIN GER GER RUS

List of language codes

Authorship


See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CAT Catalan (Català) (Salvador Pila) , "L'anyell", copyright © 2014, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) (Thomas Schubert) , "Das Lamm", copyright ©, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) [singable] (Bertram Kottmann) , copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • RUS Russian (Русский) [singable] (Dmitri Nikolaevich Smirnov) , "Агнец", copyright ©, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Little Lamb, who made thee?
Dost thou know who made thee?
Gave thee life, and [bid]1 thee feed,
By the stream and o'er the mead;
Gave thee clothing of delight,
Softest clothing woolly, bright;
Gave thee such a tender voice,
Making all the vales rejoice?
Little Lamb, who made thee?
Dost thou know who made thee?

Little Lamb, I'll tell thee,
Little Lamb, I'll tell thee:
He is callèd by thy name,
For He calls Himself a Lamb.
He is meek, and He is mild:
He became a little child.
I a child, and thou a lamb,
We are callèd by His name.
Little Lamb, God bless thee!
Little Lamb, God bless thee!


View original text (without footnotes)
1 MacNutt, Somervell: "bade"

Submitted by Ted Perry

12. To musique, to becalme his fever [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): GER

List of language codes

Authorship


See other settings of this text.


Charm me asleep, and melt me so
With thy delicious numbers,
That, being ravish'd, hence I go
Away in easy slumbers.
Ease my sick head,
And make my bed,
Thou power that canst sever
From me this ill,
And quickly still,
Though thou not kill
My fever.

Thou sweetly canst convert the same
From a consuming fire
Into a gentle licking flame,
And make it thus expire.
Then make me weep
My pains asleep;
And give me such reposes
That I, poor I,
May think thereby
I live and die
'Mongst roses.

Fall on me like a silent dew,
Or like those maiden showers
Which, by the peep of day, do strew
A baptism o'er the flowers
Melt, melt my pains
With thy soft strains;
That, having ease me given,
With full delight
I leave this light,
And take my flight
[For]1 Heaven.


View original text (without footnotes)
1 Gideon: "To"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Gentle Reminder
This website began in 1995 as a personal project, and I have been working on it full-time without a salary since 2008. Our research has never had any government or institutional funding, so if you found the information here useful, please consider making a donation. Your gift is greatly appreciated.
     - Emily Ezust

Browse imslp.org (Petrucci Music Library) for Lieder or choral works