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The Tempest Songbook

Word count: 337

Song Cycle by Kaija Saariaho (b. 1952)

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1. Ariel's Hail

Note: this is a multi-text setting

Arial:
 All hail, great master! Grave Sir, hail! I come
 To answer thy best pleasure; be it to fly,
 To swim, to dive into the fire, to ride
 On the curled clouds, -- to thy strong bidding task
 Ariel and all his quality.

[Prospero: Hast thou, spirit,
Perform'd to point the tempest that I bade thee?]1

Ariel:
 I boarded the king's ship; now on the beak,
 Now in the waist, the deck, in every cabin,
 I flamed amazement: sometime [I'ld]2 divide,
 And burn in many [places;]3 [on the topmast,
 The yards and bowsprit, would I flame distinctly,
 Then meet and join. Jove's lightnings, the precursors
 O' the dreadful thunder-claps, more momentary
 And sight-outrunning were not; the fire and cracks
 Of sulphurous roaring the most mighty Neptune
 Seem to besiege and make his bold waves tremble,
 Yea, his dread trident shake.]1

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1 omitted by Saariaho.
2 Saariaho: "I'd"
3 Saariaho: "places."


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

[I told you, sir, they were red-hot with drinking;
So fun of valour that they smote the air
For breathing in their faces, beat the ground
For kissing of their feet; yet always bending
Towards their project.]1 Then I beat my tabour,
At which, like unbacked colts, they pricked their ears,
Advanced their eyelids, lifted up their noses
As they smelt music. So I charmed their ears
[That calf-like they my lowing followed through
Toothed briars, sharp furzes, pricking goss and thorns,
Which entered their frail shins. At last I left them
I'th' filthy-mantled pool beyond your cell,
There dancing up to th' chins, that the foul lake
O'er-stunk their feet]1.

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1 omitted by Saariaho.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Caliban's Dream [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE ITA

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Be not afeard: the isle is full of noises,
Sounds, and sweet airs, that give delight, and hurt not.
Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments
Will hum about mine ears; and sometimes voices,
That, if I then had wak'd after long sleep,
Will make me sleep again: and then, in dreaming,
The clouds methought would open and show riches
Ready to drop upon me; that, when I wak'd,
I cried to [dream]1 again.


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1 Saariaho: "sleep"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. Miranda's Lament [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE

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Miranda:
 If by your art, my dearest father, you have
 Put the wild waters in this roar, allay them.
 The sky, it seems, would pour down stinking pitch,
 But that the sea, mounting to [th' welkin's cheek]1
 Dashes the fire out. O, I have suffered
 With those that I saw suffer! [ A brave vessel
 Who had, no doubt, some noble creature in her
 Dashed all to pieces. ]2 O, the cry did knock
 Against my very heart! Poor souls, they perished!
 Had I been any god of power, I would
 Have sunk the sea within the earth, or ere
 It should the good ship so have swallowed, and
 The fraughting souls within her.

Prospero: Be collected:
 No more amazement: tell your [piteous]3 heart
 There's no harm done.


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1 Saariaho: "the face of sky"
2 Omitted by Saariaho.
3 Saariaho: "pitying"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. Prospero's Vision [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE

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You do look, my son, in a moved sort,
As if you were dismay'd: be cheerful, sir.
[Our revels now are ended.]1 These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp'd towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep. Sir, I am vex'd;
[Bear with my weakness; my, brain is troubled:
Be not disturb'd with my infirmity:
If you be pleased, retire into my cell
And there repose:]1 a turn or two I'll walk,
To still my beating mind.


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1 omitted by Saariaho.

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

5. Ferdinand's Comfort

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Where should this music be? i' th' air or th' earth?
It sounds no more;--and sure it waits upon
Some god o' th' island. Sitting on a bank,
Weeping again the king my father's wrack,
This music crept by me upon the waters,
Allaying both their fury and my passion,
With its sweet air: thence I have follow'd it,--
Or it hath drawn me rather,--but 'tis gone.
No, it begins again.

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Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Full fathom five thy father lies,
Of his bones are coral made;
Those are pearls that were his eyes:
Nothing of him that doth fade,
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell:
[Ding-dong.]1
Hark! now I hear them, - ding-dong bell.

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • DUT Dutch (Nederlands) (Lidy van Noordenburg) , "Vijf vadem diep", copyright © 2008, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FIN Finnish (Suomi) (Erkki Pullinen) , copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FRE French (Français) (Guy de Pourtalès)
  • GER German (Deutsch) [singable] (David Paley) , "Voll Faden fünf", copyright © 2012, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • IRI Irish (Gaelic) [singable] (Gabriel Rosenstock) , copyright © 2014, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Ferdinando Albeggiani) , "Tuo padre giace a una profondità di cinque tese", copyright © 2008, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • NOR Norwegian (Bokmål) (Arild Bakke) , "På fem favner", copyright © 2004, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

View original text (without footnotes)
1 omitted by Ives.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

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