The LiederNet Archive
WARNING. Not all the material on this website is in the public domain.
It is illegal to copy and distribute our copyright-protected material without permission.
For more information, contact us at the following address:
licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net

Five Thomas Hardy Songs

Word count: 259

Song Cycle by Derek Healey (b. 1936)

Show the texts alone (bare mode).

?. More than one cuckoo

Language: English

Authorship


Go to the single-text view


More than one cuckoo?
 . . . . . . . . . .

[--- The rest of this text is not
currently in the database but will be
added as soon as we obtain it. ---]

?. In Time of 'The Breaking of Nations' [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Authorship


See other settings of this text.


Only a man harrowing clods
In a slow silent walk
With an old horse that stumbles and nods
Half asleep as they stalk.

Only thin smoke without flame
From the heaps of couch-grass1;
Yet this will go onward the same
Though Dynasties pass.

Yonder a maid and her wight2
Come whispering by:
War's annals will cloud into night
Ere their story die.


View original text (without footnotes)
First published in Saturday Review, January, 1916
1 couch-grass: a type of weed.
2 wight: man.

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

?. This is the weather the cuckoo likes [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Authorship


See other settings of this text.


 This is the weather the cuckoo likes,
	And so do I;
 When showers betumble the chestnut spikes,
	And nestlings fly;
 And the little brown nightingale bills his best,
 And they sit outside at "The Traveller's Rest",
 And maids come forth sprig-muslin drest,
 And citizens dream of the south and west,
	And so do I.

 This is the weather the shepherd shuns,
	And so do I;
 When beeches drip in browns and duns,
	And thresh and ply;
 And hill-hid tides throb, throe on throe,
 And meadow rivulets overflow,
 And drops on gate bars hang in a row,
 And rooks in families homeward go,
	And so do I.


First published in Good Housekeeping, London, May 1922

Submitted by Ted Perry

?. There's no winsome woman [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Authorship


Go to the single-text view


There's no winsome woman so winsome as she;
  Some are flower-like in mouth,
  Some have fire in the eyes,
  Some feed a soul's drouth
  Trilling words music-wise;
But where are these gifts all in one found to be
  Save in her known to me?

What her thoughts are I read not, but this much I know,
  That she, too, will pass
  From the sun and the air
  To her cave under grass;
  And the world will declare,
"No such woman as his passioned utterances show
  Walked this planet, we trow!"


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Gentle Reminder
This website began in 1995 as a personal project, and I have been working on it full-time without a salary since 2008. Our research has never had any government or institutional funding, so if you found the information here useful, please consider making a donation. Your gift is greatly appreciated.
     - Emily Ezust

Browse imslp.org (Petrucci Music Library) for Lieder or choral works