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Four Madrigals

Word count: 430

Song Cycle by Hans Gál (1890 - 1987)

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1. Youth and Cupid [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

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When I was fair and young, and favour graced me,
Of many was I sought, their mistress for to be.
But I did scorn them all, and [said to]1 them therefore:
"Go, go, go, seek some otherwhere, importune me no more."

[ ... ]
Then spake fair Venus' son, that proud, victorious boy, [Saying: You dainty dame, for]2 that you be so coy, I will so pluck your [plumes as]3 you shall say no more: "Go, go, go, seek some otherwhere, importune me no more." [As soon as he had said]4, such change grew in my breast That neither night [nor day I could take]5 any rest, [Wherefore I]6 did repent that I had said before: "Go, go, go, seek some otherwhere, importune me no more."

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Gál: "answered"
2 Gál: "And said: Fine dame, since"
3 Gál: "plumes, that"
4 Gál: "When he had spake these words"
5 Gál: "or day since that I could find"
6 Gál: "Then lo! I"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. True love [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

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My true love hath my heart, and I have his,
  By just exchange one [for another]1 given:
I hold his dear, and mine he cannot miss,
  There never was a better bargain driven:
      My true love hath my heart, and I have his.
 
His heart in me keeps him and me in one,
  My heart in him his thoughts and senses guides:
He loves my heart, for once it was his own,
  I cherish his because in me it bides:
      My true love hath my heart, and I have his.


View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with Francis T. Palgrave, ed. (1824-1897), The Golden Treasury., 1875, as "A ditty"

Parodied in Archibald Stodart-Walker's My true friend hath my hat.

1 Parry: "to the other"

Note: Somervell's setting has several changes to the punctuation (as supplied by Mike Pearson):

Line One: No first comma
Line Two: "giv'n" and full stop not colon
Line Three: No first comma
Line Four: "driv'n" and full stop not colon
Line Five: No first comma
Line Seven: Full stop not colon
Line Eight: Full stop not colon
Line Ten: No first comma

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. A cradle song [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE

List of language codes

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Golden slumbers kiss your eyes,
Smiles awake you when you rise:
Sleep, pretty wantons, do not cry,
And I will sing a lullaby,
[Rock them, rock [them]1, lullaby.]2

[Care is heavy, therefore sleep you;
You are care and care must keep you:
Sleep, pretty wantons, do not cry,
And I will sing a lullaby:
Rock them, rock [them]1, lullaby.]3


View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with Henry Chettle and Thomas Dekker, Patient Grissil, London, 1632. Modernized spelling.

1Warlock: "a lulla"
2 omitted by Casella.
3 Casella replaces this stanza with the following:
 Care you know not, therefore sleep,
 while I o'er you watch do keep.
 Sleep, pretty darling, do not cry,
 and I will sing a lullaby.

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. Foolish love [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

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Some say love, foolish love,
doth rule and govern gods.
I say love, inconstant love,
sets men's senses far at odds.
Some swear love, smooth-face love,
is sweetest sweet that men can have.
I say love, sour love,
makes virtue yield as beauty's slave.
A bitter sweet, a folly vorst of all,
that forceth wisdom to be folly's thrall.
Love is sweet.
In fading pleasures that do pain.
Wherein sweet? Is that sweet,
that yieldeth sorrow for a gain?
If love's sweet, herein sweet,
that minute's joys are monthly woes.
'Tis not sweet, that is sweet nowhere
but where repentance grows.
Then love who list, if beauty be so sour:
Labour for me; love rest in prince's bower.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

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