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Herrick Cantata

Word count: 927

Cantata by John Linton Gardner (b. 1917)

Show the texts alone (bare mode).

1. To music, a song [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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Music, thou Queen of Heaven, Care-charming-spell,
  That strik'st a stillness into hell: 
Thou that tam'st Tygers, and fierce storms (that rise)
  With thy soul-melting Lullabies: 
Fall down, down, down, from those thy chiming spheres,
To charm our souls, as thou enchant'st our ears.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. To daisies, not to shut too soon [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Translation(s): GER

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Shut not so soon; the dull-eyed night
Has not as yet begun
To make a seizure on the light,
Or to seal up the sun.

No marigolds yet closed are;
No shadows great appear;
Nor doth the early shepherds' star
Shine like a spangle here.

Stay but till my Julia close
Her life-begetting eye,
And let the whole world then dispose
Itself to live or die.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. A dialogue betwixt himself and Mistress Eliza Wheeler [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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My dearest Love, since thou wilt go,
And leave me here behind thee;
For love or pity, let me know
The place where I may find thee.

AMARIL. In country meadows, pearl'd with dew,
And set about with lilies;
There, filling maunds with cowslips, you
May find your Amarillis.

HER. What have the meads to do with thee,
Or with thy youthful hours?
Live thou at court, where thou mayst be
The queen of men, not flowers.

Let country wenches make 'em fine
With posies, since 'tis fitter
For thee with richest gems to shine,
And like the stars to glitter.

AMARIL. You set too-high a rate upon
A shepherdess so homely.
HER. Believe it, dearest, there's not one
I' th' court that's half so comely.

I prithee stay. AMARIL. I must away;
Let's kiss first, then we'll sever;
AMBO And though we bid adieu to day,
We shall not part for ever.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. Cherry ripe [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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Cherry-ripe, ripe, ripe, I cry,
Full and fair ones; come and buy.
If [so]1 be you ask me where
They do grow, I answer: There,
Where my Julia's lips do smile;
There's the land, or cherry-isle,
Whose plantations fully show
All the year where cherries grow.


View original text (without footnotes)
1 Rorem: "it"

Submitted by Paul Hindemith

5. Love: what it is [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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Love is a circle, that doth restless move
In the same sweet eternity of Love.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

6. To love

Language: English

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[--- This text is not currently
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7. Corinna's gone a-Maying [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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Get up, get up for shame, the blooming morn
Upon her wings presents the god unshorn.
See how Aurora throws her fair
Fresh-quilted colours through the air;
Get up, sweet slugabed, and see
The dew bespangling herb and tree,
Each flower has wept, and bowed towards the east,
Above an hour since, yet you not dressed,
Nay! not so much as out of bed;
When all the birds have matins said,
And sung their thankful hymns: 'tis sin,
Nay, profanation to keep in,
When as a thousand virgins on this day,
Spring, sooner than the lark, to fetch in May.
Rise, and put on your foliage, and be seen
To come forth like the springtime, - fresh and green,
And sweet as Flora. Take no care
For jewels for your gown or hair:
Fear not, the leaves will strew
Gems in abundance upon you:
Besides, the childhood of the day has kept
Against you come, some orient pearls unwept.
Come, and receive them while the light
Hangs on the dewlocks of the night,
And Titan on the eastern hill
Retires himself, or else stands still
Till you come forth... Wash, dress, be brief in praying:
Few beads are best, when once we go a-Maying.
Come, let us go, while we are in our prime,
And take the harmless folly of the time.
We shall grow old apace and die
Before we know our liberty.
Our life is short, and our days run
As fast away as does the sun:
And as a vapour, or a drop of rain
Once lost, can ne'er be found again:
So when or you or I are made
A fable, song, or fleeting shade,
All love, all liking, all delight,
Lies drowned with us in endless night.
Then while time serves, and we are but decaying,
Come, my Corinna, come, let's go a-Maying.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

8. To Music, to becalm his fever [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Translation(s): GER

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Charm me asleep, and melt me so
With thy delicious numbers,
That, being ravish'd, hence I go
Away in easy slumbers.
Ease my sick head,
And make my bed,
Thou power that canst sever
From me this ill,
And quickly still,
Though thou not kill
My fever.

Thou sweetly canst convert the same
From a consuming fire
Into a gentle licking flame,
And make it thus expire.
Then make me weep
My pains asleep;
And give me such reposes
That I, poor I,
May think thereby
I live and die
'Mongst roses.

Fall on me like a silent dew,
Or like those maiden showers
Which, by the peep of day, do strew
A baptism o'er the flowers
Melt, melt my pains
With thy soft strains;
That, having ease me given,
With full delight
I leave this light,
And take my flight
[For]1 Heaven.


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1 Gideon: "To"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

9. On himself

Language: English

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[--- This text is not currently
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10. To Anthea, who may command him anything [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE

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Bid me to live, and I will live
  Thy Protestant to be:
Or bid me love, and I will give
  A loving heart to thee.

A heart as soft, a heart as kind,
  A heart as sound and free,
As in the whole world thou canst find,
 That heart I'll give to thee.

Bid that heart stay, and it will stay,
  To honour thy Decree:
Or bid it languish quite away,
  And 't shall doe so for thee.

Bid me to weep, and I will weep,
  While I have eyes to see:
And having none, yet I will keep
  A heart to weep for thee.

Bid me despair, and I'll despair,
  Under that cypress-tree:
Or bid me die, and I will dare
  E'en Death, to die for thee.

Thou art my life, my love, my heart,
The very eyes of me:
And has command of ev'ry part,
To live and die for thee.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

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