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Eight songs : for a cappella chorus from poems of Thomas Hardy

Word count: 583

Song Cycle by Donald Waxman (b. 1925)

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1. Let me enjoy [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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Let me enjoy the earth no less
Because the all-enacting Might
That fashioned forth its loveliness
Had other aims than my delight.

About my path there flits a Fair,
Who throws me not a word or sign;
I'll charm me with her ignoring air,
And laud the lips not meant for mine.

From manuscripts of moving song
Inspired by scenes and dreams unknown
I'll pour out raptures that belong
To others, as they were my own.

And some day hence, towards Paradise
And all its blest - if such should be -
I will lift glad, a far-off eyes,
Though it contain no place for me.


First published in Cornhill Magazine and Putnam's Magazine, both in April 1909

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Waiting both [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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A star looks down at me,
And says: "Here I and you
Stand, each in our degree:
What do you mean to do, -
  Mean to do?"

I say: "For all I know,
Wait, and let Time go by,
Till my change come." - "Just so,"
The star says: "So mean I: -
  So mean I."


First published in London Mercury November 1924

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. First or last [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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If grief come early
Joy comes late,
If joy come early
Grief will wait;
Aye, my dear and tender!

Wise ones joy them early
While the cheeks are red,
Banish grief till surly
Time has dulled their dread.

And joy being ours
Ere youth has flown,
The later hours
May find us gone;
Aye, my dear and tender!


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. The reminder [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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While I watch the Christmas blaze
Paint the room with ruddy rays,
Something makes my vision glide
To the frosty scene outside.

There, to reach a rotting berry,
Toils a thrush, -- constrained to very
Dregs of food by sharp distress,
Taking such with thankfulness.

Why, O starving bird, when I
One day's joy would justify,
And put misery out of view,
Do you make me notice you!


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

5. I need not go [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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I need not go
Through sleet and snow
To where I know
She waits for me;
She will tarry me there
Till I find it fair,
And have time to spare
From company.

When I've overgot
The world somewhat,
When things cost not
Such stress and strain,
Is soon enough
By cypress sough
To tell my Love
I am come again.

And if  someday,
When none cries nay,
I still delay
To seek her side,
(Though ample measure
Of fitting leisure
Await my pleasure)
She will not chide.

What not upbraid me
That I delayed me,
Nor ask what stayed me
So long? Ah no!
New cares may claim me,
New loves inflame me,
She will not blame me,
But suffer it so.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

6. The ballad singer [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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Sing, Ballad-singer, raise a hearty tune;
Make me forget that there was ever a one
I walked with in the meek light of the moon
   When the day's work was done.

Rhyme, Ballad-rhymer, start a country song;
Make me forget that she whom I loved well
Swore she would love me dearly, love me long,
   Then - what I cannot tell!

Sing, Ballad-singer, from your little book;
Make me forget those heart-breaks, achings, fears;
Make me forget her name, her sweet sweet look -
   Make me forget her tears.


First published in Cornhill Magazine, April 1902, revised 1909

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

7. On a midsummer eve [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

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I idly cut a parsley stalk,
And blew therein towards the moon;
I had not thought what ghosts would walk
With shivering footsteps to my tune.

I went, and knelt, and scooped my hand
As if to drink, into the brook,
And a faint figure seemed to stand
Above me, with the bygone look.

I lipped rough rhymes of chance, not choice,
I thought not what my words might be;
There came into my ear a voice
That turned a tenderer verse for me.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

8. To a joyful lady singing

Language: English

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[--- This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. ---]

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