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The LiederNet Archive

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The Tear‑Drop

Language: Scottish (Scots)

Wae is my heart, and the tear's in my e'e;
Lang, lang has Joy been a stranger to me:
Forsaken and friendless, my burden I bear,
And the sweet voice o' Pity ne'er sounds in my ear.

Love thou hast pleasures, and deep hae I luv'd;
Love, thou hast sorrows, and sair hae I pruv'd;
But this bruised heart that now bleeds in my breast,
I can feel, by its throbbings, will soon be at rest.

Oh, if I were - where happy I hae been -
Down by yon stream, and yon bonnie castle-green;
For there he is wand'ring and musing on me,
Wha wad soon dry the tear-drop that clings to my e'e.


Translation(s): GER GER GER

List of language codes

Note: Beethoven uses the second verse of this text between two verses by Anne Grant in the song "In vain to this desert my fate I deplore".

Submitted by Sharon Krebs [Guest Editor]

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

  • Also set in German (Deutsch), a translation by Anonymous/Unidentified Artist ; composed by Ferdinand von Hiller.
  • Also set in German (Deutsch), a translation by Wilhelm Christoph Leonhard Gerhard (1780 - 1858) , "Liebesweh" ENG ; composed by Heinrich Esser, Heinrich August Marschner.
  • Also set in German (Deutsch), [adaptation] ; composed by Joseph Rheinberger.

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


Text added to the website: 2009-05-23 00:00:00.

Last modified: 2017-10-11 12:39:24

Line count: 12
Word count: 115

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     - Emily Ezust

Wie ist mein Auge so thränenschwer!

Language: German (Deutsch) after the Scottish (Scots)

Wie ist mein Auge so thränenschwer!
Schon lange kennt mich die Freude nicht mehr;
Nicht Mitleid flüstert mir Trost in's Ohr,
Und tief betraur' ich, was ich verlor.

Die Liebe hat Wonnen, ich habe geliebt;
Die Liebe hat Trübsal, ich war betrübt;
Noch klopft mir im Busen das Herz so schwer:
Doch bald - ich fühl' es - bald klopft's nicht mehr.

O wär' ich dort, wo ich selig war,
An jenem Strome so hell und klar!
Dort schweifet mein Lieb am Wanderstab;
Der wischte wohl gern die Thräne mir ab.


Translation(s): ENG

List of language codes

About the headline (FAQ)

Confirmed with Robert Burns' Gedichte, deutsch von W. Gerhard, Mit des Dichters Leben und erläuternden Bemerkungen, Leipzig, 1840, page 234.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Authorship


Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Sharon Krebs) , copyright © 2017, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Text added to the website: 2015-05-04 00:00:00.

Last modified: 2015-05-04 10:08:11

Line count: 12
Word count: 91