The LiederNet Archive
WARNING. Not all the material on this website is in the public domain.
It is illegal to copy and distribute our copyright-protected material without permission.
For more information, contact us at the following address:
licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net

Ísucán

Language: Irish (Gaelic)

Ní geb-sa didu, ar isi, óm Thigerna, 
co tuca a Mac a ním i r-richt noíden 
dia altraim dam dono. 
[Co táinic in t-aíngel no gnathaiged 
 tímtirecht disi ara hamus. 
 Míthig em, athered sí fris. 
 Co n-erbairt frin: 
 doberthar duit inní conaigihi.]1 
Co táinic Críst cuicce i r-richt noíden,  
conid ann as-bert-si:2

Ísucán 
alar lium im dísiurtán; 
cía beith cléirech co lín sét, 
is bréuile acht Ísucán. 

Altram alar lium im thig, 
ní altram nach dóerathaig -- 
Ísu co feraib nime, 
frim chride cech n-óenadaig. 

[Ísucán óc mo bithmaith: 
ernaid, ocus ní maithmech. 
In Rí con-ic na uili 
cen a guidi bid aithrech.]1 

[Ísu úasal ainglide, 
noco cléirech dergnaide, 
alar lium im dísiurtán, ]1
Ísu mac na Ebraide. 

Maic na ruirech, maic na ríg, 
im thír cía do-ísatán, 
ní úaidib saílim sochor: 
is tochu lium Ísucán. 

Canaid cóir, a ingena, 
d' fir dliges bar císucán;  
atá 'na phurt túasucán 
cía beith im ucht Ísucán.


Translation(s): ENG ENG

List of language codes

View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with Volume 29 of the Henry Bradshaw Society : The Martyrology of Oengus, or Félire Óengusso Céli Dé. Translator and editor: Whitley Stokes. London: Henry Bradshaw Society, 1905, pages 42-45. Manuscript of origin: The Speckled Book, or Leabhar Breac (note: there are many alternative spellings).

Note (provided by Melanie Trumbull: There are at least six manuscripts that have this poem in them. One of these is: Royal Irish Academy, Dublin: MS 23. P. 16. The "martyrology" is a liturgical calendar, assigning to each date of the year the name-day of various saints. 15 January is the name-day for St. Ita. Copious commentary is attached to the rather cut-and-dried liturgical calendar. It is from the commentary that the context is given for St. Ita and her hymn. This includes a lengthy explanation in Old Irish prose, followed by the poetic lyric for the "Jesukin" hymn.

1 Omitted in the "Hermit Song" version by Chester Kallman and Samuel Barber.
2 This first part is the recitative excerpted from the prose commentary. The hymn/poem/'aria' embedded in the commentary to the liturgical calendar follows it.

Submitted by Melanie Trumbull

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]

Settings in other languages or adaptations:

Other available translations, adaptations, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Whitley Stokes) , title 1: "Infant Jesus"


Text added to the website: 2016-09-09.
Last modified: 2016-09-09 10:05:59
Line count: 34
Word count: 153

Gentle Reminder
This website began in 1995 as a personal project, and I have been working on it full-time without a salary since 2008. Our research has never had any government or institutional funding, so if you found the information here useful, please consider making a donation. Your gift is greatly appreciated.
     - Emily Ezust

Infant Jesus

Language: English after the Irish (Gaelic)

I will not take from my Lord, says she, 
until He give me His Son out of heaven      
in the form of a babe to be nursed by me.  
Then came towards her 
the angel who used to attend her. 
'Tis time indeed, she said to him. 
Whereupon he said to her: 
What thou askest will be given to thee.
So Christ came to her in the form of a babe, 
and then she said:   

Infant Jesus 
nursed by me in my little hermitage, 
though it be a cleric with worldly treasures, 
all is a lie save infant Jesus. 

The nursling that is nursed by me in my house, 
is not the nursling of a base clown -- 
Jesus with the angels of heaven 
before my heart every single night. 

Infant Jesus, my eternal good: 
for heed of Him, He is not remiss.
The King who controls all things, 
not to beseech him will cause repentance.

Jesus, noble, angelic, 
no faded common cleric, 
nursed by me in my little hermitage,
Jesus, son of the woman of the Hebrews.  

The sons of princes, the sons of kings, 
should they come into my country, 
not from these do I expect profit:
more likely to me is infant Jesus. 

Sing a chorus, daughters [virgins/maidens], 
to Him that has the right to your modest tribute. 
He is in his place above, 
though in my bosom is infant Jesus.


Confirmed with Volume 29 of the Henry Bradshaw Society : The Martyrology of Oengus, or Félire Óengusso Céli Dé. Translator and editor: Whitley Stokes. London: Henry Bradshaw Society, 1905, pages 42-45.


Submitted by Melanie Trumbull

Authorship


Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Text added to the website: 2016-09-09.
Last modified: 2016-09-09 10:16:40
Line count: 34
Word count: 233