by Charles Baudelaire (1821 - 1867)
Translation © by Charles Hopkins (1952 - 2007)

Correspondances
Language: French (Français) 
Available translation(s): ENG HUN
La Nature est un temple où de vivants piliers
Laissent parfois sortir de confuses paroles ;
L'homme y passe à travers des forêts de symboles
Qui l'observent avec des regards familiers.

Comme de longs échos qui de loin se confondent,
Dans une ténébreuse et profonde unité,
Vaste comme la nuit et comme la clarté,
Les parfums, les couleurs et les sons se répondent.

Il est des parfums frais comme des chairs d'enfants,
Doux comme les hautbois, verts comme les prairies,
-- Et d'autres, corrompus, riches et triomphants,

Ayant l'expansion des choses infinies,
Comme l'ambre, le musc, le benjoin et l'encens,
Qui chantent les transports de l'esprit et des sens.

Confirmed with Les Fleurs du mal, Spleen et Idéal, Paris: Poulet-Malassis et de Broise, 1857, pages 19-20.


Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CZE Czech (Čeština) (Jaroslav Goll) , "Souzvuky"
  • ENG English (Emily Wyatt) , "Correspondences", copyright © 2012, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ENG English (Charles Hopkins) , "Correlatives", written 2002, copyright ©, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ENG English (Charles Hopkins) , "Correlatives", written c2005, copyright ©, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ENG English (Cyril Meir Scott) , "Echoes", appears in The Flowers of Evil, first published 1909
  • HUN Hungarian (Magyar) (Tamás Rédey) , "Kapcsolódások", copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • POR Portuguese (Português) (Delfim Guimarães) , "Correspondências"


Research team for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator] , Poom Andrew Pipatjarasgit [Guest Editor]
Correlatives
Language: English  after the French (Français) 
Nature is a temple[,] in which living pillars
sometimes let out a confusion of words;
[]1 Man passes through it across forests of symbols
that watch him with knowing glances.

Like extended echoes which merge with one another far away
to become a murky deep oneness,
as vast as darkness and light together,
the scents, the colours and the sounds relate each to the other.

There are fragrances[,] fresh like the flesh of children,
mellow as oboes, green as meadows,
- and others, corrupted, rich and triumphant,

With the expansive power of infinite things,
things such as amber, musk, benjamin and incense,
which voice the rapturous ecstasy of the mind and of the senses.

View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with an original Microsoft Word Document provided by Alistair Hinton.

1 Hopkins forgot to include a line break here.

Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Researcher for this text: Poom Andrew Pipatjarasgit [Guest Editor]