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Le roi a fait battre tambour

Language: French (Français)

Le roi a fait battre tambour, 
Le roi a fait battre tambour, 
Pour voir toutes ses dames,
Et la première qu'il a vue
Lui a ravi son âme !

« Marquis, dis-moi, la connais-tu ?
Marquis, dis-moi, la connais-tu ?
Qui est [cette jolie]1 dame ? » 
[Et le]2 marquis lui a répondu :
« Sire roi, c'est ma femme ! » 

« Marquis, tu es plus heureux [que moi]3,
Marquis, tu es plus heureux que moi
D'avoir femme si belle ;
Si tu voulais me l'accorder,
[Je coucherais avec elle]4 ! »

« [Sire]5, si vous n'étiez pas le roi,
[Sire]5, si vous n'étiez pas le roi,
J'en tirerais vengeance !
Mais puisque vous êtes le roi, 
A votre obéissance ! »

« Marquis, ne te fâche donc pas,
Marquis, ne te fâche donc pas,
[Tu auras]6 ta récompense ;
Je te ferai dans mes armées
Beau maréchal de France ! » 

-- « Habille-toi bien proprement,
» Habille-toi bien proprement, 
Coiffure à la dentelle ;
Habille-toi bien proprement,
Comme une demoiselle !

« Adieu, ma mie, adieu, mon cœur,
Adieu, ma mie, adieu, mon cœur,
Adieu, mon espérance ;
Puisqu'il te faut servir le roi,
Séparons-nous d'ensemble ! » 

La reine a fait faire un bouquet,
La reine a fait faire un bouquet,
De belles fleurs de lys...
Et la senteur de ce bouquet 
A fait mourir marquise ! 

« Moi, dont le cœur est en lambeaux,
Moi, dont le cœur est en lambeaux, 
J'irai sous la pelouse 
Te joindre au fond de ton tombeau,
Ma perle et mon épouse ! »


Translation(s): ENG

List of language codes

M. Déodat de Séverac sets stanzas 1-5, 7
G. Ferrari sets stanzas 1-8

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with La Tradition. Revue Générale des Contes, Légendes, Chants, Usages, Traditions et Arts populaires, directeurs: Mm. Émile Blémont et Henry Carnoy, Tome V -- Année 1891, Paris, Aux Bureaux de La Tradition, page 62, listed as no. 2 of Chansons populaires du Quercy, and attributed to "Froment de Beaurepaire".

Note: Déodat de Séverac and Ferrari add a refrain consisting of variations on and segments of the word "Rataplan"

1 Déodat de Séverac, Ferrari: "cett' joli"
2 Déodat de Séverac, Ferrari: "Et le"
3 Déodat de Séverac, Ferrari: "qu'moi"
4 Déodat de Séverac, Ferrari: "Je me chargerais d'elle"
5 Déodat de Séverac, Ferrari: "Sir' "
6 Déodat de Séverac, Ferrari: "T'auras"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator] and Ted Perry and Garrett Medlock [Guest Editor]

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Garrett Medlock) , copyright © 2019, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.

Last modified: 2019-01-13 15:41:51
Line count: 45
Word count: 263

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The king had the drum beaten

Language: English after the French (Français)

The king had the drum beaten,
The king had the drum beaten
To see all of his [kingdom’s] ladies
And the first that he saw
[Stole away]1 his soul.

Marquis, tell me, do you know her?
Marquis, tell me, do you know her?
Who is this pretty lady?
The Marquis answered him:
Sire, that is my wife.

Marquis, you are luckier than me,
Marquis, you are luckier than me
To have such [a] beautiful wife.
If you wanted to give her to me
[I would sleep with her]2.

Sire, if you were not the king,
Sire, if you were not the king
I would get [my] revenge,
But since you are the king,
[I am] at your [command].

Marquis do not be angry then,
Marquis do not be angry then,
You will have your reward;
I will make you in my armies
[The] fine marshall of France.

Dress yourself up properly,
Dress yourself up properly,
[Your] hairstyle [done up with] lace.
Dress yourself up properly
Like a [young] maiden.

Goodbye my soul, goodbye my heart,
Goodbye my soul, goodbye my heart,
Goodbye my hope!
Since you must serve the king,
We separate from each other.

The queen had a bouquet made,
The queen had a bouquet made
Of beautiful lily flowers;
And the scent of this bouquet
Made [the] marquise die.

"Me, whose heart is in tatters,
Me, whose heart is in tatters,
I will go under the grass
To join you at the bottom of your tomb,
My pearl and my wife!"


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)

Translations of title(s):
"Le roi a fait battre tambour" = "The king had the drum beaten"
"Le Roy a fait battre tambour" = "The king had the drum beaten"

1 Or "delighted/thrilled"
2 Deodat de Severac, Ferrari: "I would take care of her"

Authorship

  • Translation from French (Français) to English copyright © 2019 by Garrett Medlock, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in French (Français) from Volkslieder (Folksongs)
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Marie-Joseph-Alexandre Déodat de Séverac, Gustave Ferrari, Willem Pijper. Go to the text.
  • a text in French (Français) possibly by Paul de Froment de Beaurepaire (1872 - 1914)
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Marie-Joseph-Alexandre Déodat de Séverac, Gustave Ferrari, Willem Pijper. Go to the text.

 

Text added to the website: 2019-01-07.
Last modified: 2019-01-15 21:42:53
Line count: 45
Word count: 253