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How should I your true love know

Language: English after the English

How should I your true love know
From another one?
By his cockle hat and staff,
And his sandal shoon.

He is dead and gone, lady,
He is dead and gone;
At his head a grass green turf,
At his heels a stone.

White his shroud as the mountain snow,
Larded with sweet [flowers]1;
Which bewept to the grave did go
With true-love [showers]2.

And will he not come again?
And will he not come again?
No, no, he is dead:
Go to thy deathbed.
He never, never will come again,
He never will come again.

His beard was as white as snow,
All flaxen was his poll;
He is gone,
And we cast away moan:
God ha' mercy on his soul.


Translation(s): FRE GER GER GER GER ITA POL

List of language codes

R. Quilter sets stanzas 1-3
J. Brahms sets stanzas 1-2

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)

Note: this is often referred to as the Walsingham Ballad, and is quoted in Shakespeare's Hamlet, Act IV, Scene 5

Dante Gabriel Rossetti's poem An old song ended refers to this song.

1 White: "flow'rs"
2 White: "show'rs"

Submitted by Ted Perry

Authorship


Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.

Last modified: 2017-10-11 12:39:24
Line count: 23
Word count: 122

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Come potrò riconoscere il vero amore

Language: Italian (Italiano) after the English

Come potrò riconoscere il vero amore
Da un altro?
Dal cappello a conchiglia, dal bastone
E dai sandali.
 
Da tempo è morto e sepolto,
morto e sepolto, fanciulla!
Sul suo capo una zolla d'erba,
Una pietra ai suoi piedi.


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About the headline (FAQ)

Authorship

  • Translation from English to Italian (Italiano) copyright © 2008 by Ferdinando Albeggiani, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on
  • a text in English by Anonymous/Unidentified Artist [an adaptation] ENG FRE GER GER GER GER POL
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Kim Borg, Benjamin C. S. Boyle, Johannes Brahms, Natho Henn, John Jeffreys, Osvaldo Costa de Lacerda, Elizabeth Maconchy, Roger Quilter, Maude Valérie White. Go to the text.
  • a text in English misattributed to William Shakespeare (1564 - 1616) ENG FRE GER GER GER GER POL
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Kim Borg, Benjamin C. S. Boyle, Johannes Brahms, Natho Henn, John Jeffreys, Osvaldo Costa de Lacerda, Elizabeth Maconchy, Roger Quilter, Maude Valérie White. Go to the text.

Based on

 

Text added to the website: 2008-08-13.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:02:51
Line count: 8
Word count: 39