The LiederNet Archive
WARNING. Not all the material on this website is in the public domain.
It is illegal to copy and distribute our copyright-protected material without permission.
For more information, contact us at the following address:
licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net

Den breda älf genom skogens barm

Language: Swedish (Svenska)

Den breda älf genom skogens barm
sitt blånande bälte drar.
Allt måste följa med makt och larm,
som trotsat dess bölja har.

Allt hastar till vredgade segrarens fot,
till skogens brusande älf,
stock, sten och träd och krypande rot,
att smickra och spegla sig själf.

Men snigeln på mossiga stenen en gång
fått fäste bland böljornas brus.
Den mäktige ryster, och gör förfång,
och spottar jämt på hans hus

Men snigeln håller sig stadigt fast,
densamme i ebb och flod,
föraktad att yttre fägring den brast,
men därför ej mindre god.

Så kom där en barfotad gosse glad
att plocka musslor vid strand.
Han bröt dem sakta ur vågens bad,
vår snigels hus däribland.

Men när ban öppnade det han såg
en ren, en strålande glans.
I musslans sargade sköte låg
den skönsta pärla som fanns.

Snart blef så älfven till is försatt.
Ty vinter följde på höst;
men pärlan smyckade dag och natt
den skönaste drottnings bröst.


Translation(s): ENG FIN FRE GER

List of language codes

About the headline (FAQ)

Confirmed with Ernst Josephson, Svarta Rosor och Gula, C. & E. Gernandts Förlags Aktiebolag, Stockholm, 1901, page 139.

Sibelius's score uses different spellings:

Den breda elf genom skogens barm
Sitt blånande bälte drar.
Allt måste följa med makt och larm,
Som trotsat dess bölja har.

Allt hastar till vredgade segrarens fot,
Till skogens brusande elf,
Stock, sten och träd, och krypande rot,
Att smickra och spegla sig sjelf.

Men snigeln på mossiga stenen en gång
Fått fäste bland böljornas brus.
Den mäktige ryter, och gör förfång,
Och spottar jemt på hans hus.

Men snigeln håller sig stadigt fast,
Densamme i ebb och i flod,
Föraktad att yttre fägring den brast,
Men derför ej mindre god.

Så kom där en barfotad gosse glad
Att plocka musslor vid strand.
Han bröt dem sakta ur vågens bad,
Vår snigels hus deribland.

Men när han öppnade det han såg
En ren, en strålande glans.
I musslans sargade sköte låg
Den skönsta perla som fanns.

Snart blef så elfven till is försatt.
Ty vinter följde på höst;
Men perlam smyckade dag och natt
Den skönaste drottnings bröst.

Submitted by Pierre Mathé [Guest Editor]

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

  • by Jean Sibelius (1865 - 1957), "Elfven och snigeln", alternate title: "Älven och snigeln", op. 57 (8 sånger (Eight Songs)) no. 1 (1909). [voice and piano] [
     text verified 1 time
    ]

Available translations, adaptations, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • GER German (Deutsch) [singable] (Theobald Rehbaum) , title 1: "Die Muschel"
  • ENG English [singable] (Herbert Harper) , title 1: "The snail"
  • FIN Finnish (Suomi) (Erkki Pullinen) , title 1: "Joki ja etana", copyright © 2010, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FRE French (Français) (Pierre Mathé) , title 1: "La rivière et l'escargot", copyright © 2014, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.

Last modified: 2014-09-16 13:01:47
Line count: 28
Word count: 158

Gentle Reminder
This website began in 1995 as a personal project, and I have been working on it full-time without a salary since 2008. Our research has never had any government or institutional funding, so if you found the information here useful, please consider making a donation. Your gift is greatly appreciated.
     - Emily Ezust

The snail

Language: English after the Swedish (Svenska)

The river wide through the forest's deeps,
Its shimmering girdle draws.
All things know of the doom it keeps,
For breakers of rivers' laws.
 
And all things must come to the Conqueror's foot,
where foaming waters gleam,
Stock, stone and tree and creeping root,
Their shadows give to the stream.
 
A snail made his home on a mossgrown stone,
Where fiercely the waters glide.
The river covered him with foam,
And sought his house to hide.
 
The snail he clung and held full well,
In flow in ebb and flood,
His ugly body and mottled shell
Fulfilled a purpose good.
 
Now cometh a barefoot and happy lad,
To gather shells on the shore;
He takes them slowly good and bad,
And adds our snail to his store.
 
But when he broke away the shell,
He saw a radiant gleam;
In wounded body hidden well,
He found the pearl of his dream.
 
Soon passed the autumn and winters might,
In ice the river hath drest;
The pearl adorns by day and night,
A beautiful Queen's fair breast.


Note: from the Sibelius score.

Submitted by Harry Joelson

Authorship


Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Text added to the website: 2009-03-19.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:03:10
Line count: 28
Word count: 176