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Jeanne la Rousse

Language: French (Français)

Un enfant dort à sa mamelle;
Elle en porte un autre à son dos.
L'aîné qu'elle traîne après elle,
Gèle pieds nus dans ses sabots.
Hélas ! des gardes qu'il courrouce
Au loin, le père est prisonnier.
Dieu, veillez sur Jeanne-la-Rousse;
On a surpris le braconnier.
 
Je l'ai vue heureuse et parée:
Elle cousait, chantait, lisait.
Du magister fille adorée,
Par son bon cœur elle plaisait,
.l'ai pressé sa main blanche et douce,
En dansant sous le marronier.
Dieu, veillez sur Jeanne-la-Rousse;
On a surpris le braconnier.
 
Un fermier riche et de son âge,
Qu'elle espérait voir son époux,
La quitta, parcequ'au village
On riait de ses cheveux roux.
Puis deux, puis trois; chacun repousse
Jeanne qui n'a pas un denier.
Dieu, veillez sur Jeanne-la-Rousse;
On a surpris le braconnier.
 
Mais un vaurien dit : "Rousse ou blonde,
Moi, pour femme, je te choisis.
En vain les gardes font la ronde;
J'ai bon repaire et trois fusils.
Faut-il bénir mon lit de mousse;
Du château payons l'aumônier."
Dieu, veillez sur Jeanne-la-Rousse;
On a surpris le braconnier.
 
Doux besoin d'être épouse et mere
Fit céder Jeanne qui, trois fois,
Depuis, dans une joie amère,
Accoucha seule au fond des bois.
Pauvres enfants ! chacun d'eux pousse
Frais comme un bouton printanier.
Dieu, veillez sur Jeanne-la-Rousse;
On a surpris le braconnier.
 
Quel miracle un bon cœur opère!
Jeanne, fidèle à ses devoirs,
Sourit encor; car, de leur père,
Ses fils auront les cheveux noirs.
Elle sourit; car sa voix douce
Rend l'espoir à son prisonnier.
Dieu, veillez sur Jeanne-la-Rousse;
On a surpris le braconnier.


Translation(s): ENG GER

List of language codes

Air: Soir et matin sur la fougère.

Submitted by Sharon Krebs [Guest Editor]

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]

Settings in other languages:

Other available translations, adaptations, and transliterations (if applicable):


Text added to the website: 2011-01-31.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:02:00
Line count: 48
Word count: 262

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Red‑headed Jane, or The Poacher's Wife

Language: English after the French (Français)

One infant sleeping on her breast,
Another on her back at rest,
In wooden shoes, half starved with cold,
The eldest of her gown has hold.
Far off, alas! their prisoned sire,
Though bound, still braves the keeper's ire.
Red-headed Jane, God heed thy cares;
They've caught the poacher unawares!
 
The village-teacher's darling child,
I've seen her trimly dressed: she smiled,
She read, she worked, she sang -- at ease,
Her good kind heart was sure to please,
Dancing beneath the chestnut trees
Her soft, white hand I used to squeeze:
Red-headed Jane, God heed thy cares;
They've caught the poacher unawares!
 
A farmer, rich, of her own age,
Who might, she hoped, her hand engage,
By jeering villagers was led
To jilt her -- why ? her hair was red.
Twice, thrice it happened -- with disdain
All treat her -- portionless is Jane.
Red-headed Jane, God heed thy cares;
They've caught the poacher unawares!
 
At length a scape-grace says, "Or red
Or flaxen-haired, thee, Jane, I'll wed:
In vain the keepers are afield,
Three guns I've got, haunts well concealed;
If blessed our bed of moss must be,
For Castle Chaplain I've a fee.
Red-headed Jane. God heed thy cares;
They've caught the poacher unawares!
 
Jane yields to Nature's gentle plea
That wife and mother she should be:
And thrice since then, in bitter joy,
'Mid the lone woods she's borne a boy.
Poor little rogues, they shoot and thrive,
Fresh as young buds when Spring's alive.
Red-headed Jane, God heed thy cares;
They've caught the poacher unawares!
 
What wonders a good heart can do!
Jane, to her duty ever true,
Still smiles -- her boys, she can declare,
Will have their father's jet-black hair;
And still she smiles -- the prisoner's ear
Her gentle voice with hope can cheer.
Red-headed Jane, God heed thy cares;
They've caught the poacher unawares!


Submitted by Sharon Krebs [Guest Editor]

Authorship


Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Text added to the website: 2011-01-31.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:04:13
Line count: 48
Word count: 307