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Die Musik kommt

Language: German (Deutsch)

Klingkling, bumbum und tschingdada,
zieht im Triumph der Perserschah?
Und um die Ecke brausend bricht's
wie Tubaton des Weltgerichts,
voran der Schellenträger.

Brumbrum, das große Bombardon,
der Beckenschlag, das Helikon,
die Pikkolo, der Zinkenist,
die Türkentrommel, der Flötist,
und dann der Herre Hauptmann.

Der Hauptmann naht mit stolzem Sinn,
die Schuppenketten unterm Kinn,
die Schärpe schnürt den schlanken Leib,
beim Zeus! das ist kein Zeitvertreib,
und dann die Herren Leutnants.

Zwei Leutnants, rosenrot und braun,
die Fahne schützen sie als Zaun,
die Fahne kommt, den Hut nimm ab,
der sind wir treu bis an das Grab!
und dann die Grenadiere.

Der Grenadier im strammen Tritt,
in Schritt und Tritt und Tritt und Schritt,
das stampft und dröhnt und klappt und flirrt,
Laternenglas und Fenster klirrt,
und dann die kleinen Mädchen.

Die Mädchen alle, Kopf an Kopf,
das Auge blau und blond der Zopf,
aus Tür und Tor und Hof und Haus
schaut Mine, Trine, Stine aus,
vorbei ist die Musike.

Klingkling, tschingtsching und Paukenkrach,
noch aus der Ferne tönt es schwach,
ganz leise bumbumbumbum tsching;
zog da ein bunter Schmetterling,
tschingtsching, bum, um die Ecke?


Translation(s): ENG

List of language codes

Submitted by Linda Godry

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English [singable] (Fred W. Leigh) , title unknown


Text added to the website: 2013-03-18.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:05:09
Line count: 35
Word count: 185

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'Mid clash and clang and mighty roar

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

'Mid clash and clang and mighty roar,
Soldiers are marching home from war, 
Led by the big drum-major and 
The stirring regimental band.
Three cheers for the big drum-major!

The deep trombone with military blare,
Bombardon and bassoon are there;
Wieth piercing flute and picolo cone
The trumpet blast and beat of drum.
Our hearts with joy are bounding, 
Come, join the shouts resounding,
Hip,hip, hurrah!hip, hip, hurrah!

There goes the colonel riding by,
With flashing sword and gleaming eye;
How often on fields of battle he
Has led his men to victory!
Three cheers for his martial bearing!
Three cheers for the Cross he's wearing!
Hip,hip, hurrah!hip, hip, hurrah!

And now the loud and measured beat
Of soldiers marching down the street,
With sunburnt faces smiling gay,
Boys of rank and file are they.
True soldiers of our nation!
They've won our admiration.
Hip,hip, hurrah!hip, hip, hurrah!

Their duty they have nobly done,
And home return with honours won;
So loudly let your voices ring,
Bravo! The soldiers of the King!
Three cheers for Tommy Atkins!
Hip,hip, hurrah!hip, hip, hurrah!

Fair ladies love the soldiers brave
And many a dainty hand they wave;
And many a smiling maiden's eye
Beams on those heroes marching by.
How softly the band is playing!
It's distant echoes fall and rise.
Hark! How the drum-beat fades and dies.
Still fainter now the music grows;
Onward the wave of cheering flows.
The strains no more we're hearing!


About the headline (FAQ)

Submitted by Linda Godry

Authorship


Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Text added to the website: 2013-03-18.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:05:09
Line count: 42
Word count: 243