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Shakespeare Songs, Book IX

Word count: 262

by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (1895 - 1968)

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1. Merry heart [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE GER

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


When daffodils begin to peer -
   With heigh! The doxy over the dale -
Why, then comes the sweet o' the year;
   For the red blood reigns in the winter's pale.

The white sheet bleaching on the hedge -
   With heigh! The sweet birds, O how they sing!
Doth set my pugging tooth on edge;
   For a quart of ale is a dish for a king.

The lark, that tirra-lirra chants,
   With heigh! with heigh! The thrush and the jay,
Are summer songs for me and my aunts,
   While we lie tumbling in the hay.

But shall I go mourn for that, my dear?
   The pale moon shines by night:
And when I wander here and there,
   I then do most go right.

Jog on, jog on, the foot-path way,
    And merrily hent the stile-a:
A merry heart goes all the day,
   Your sad tires in a mile-a.


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1 Not set by Quilter.

Submitted by Ted Perry

2. Heavily [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE FRE

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Pardon, goddess of the night,
Those that slew thy virgin knight;
For the which, with songs of woe,
Round about her tomb they go.
Midnight, assist our moan;
Help us to sigh and groan,
Heavily, heavily:
Graves, yawn, and yield your dead,
Till death be uttered,
Heavily, heavily.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. The horn [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE GER

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


What shall he have that kill'd the deer?
His leather skin and horns to wear.
[Then sing him home; the rest shall bear this burden.]1
Take thou no scorn, to wear the horn;
It was a crest ere thou wast born:
      Thy father's father wore it,
      And thy father bore it:
The horn, the horn, the lusty horn
  Is not a thing to laugh to scorn.


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1 sometimes this appears as words in the song; other times as a stage direction.

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

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