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Four English Lyrics

Word count: 418

Song Cycle by Ernest John Moeran (1894 - 1950)

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1. Cherry ripe [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): DUT

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • DUT Dutch (Nederlands) (Lidy van Noordenburg) , "Als een tuin is haar gelaat", copyright © 2008, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


There is a garden in her face,
  Where roses and white lilies [grow]1;
A heav'nly paradise is that place,
  Wherein all pleasant fruits do [flow]2.
There cherries grow, which none may buy
Till "Cherry ripe", themselves do cry.

Those cherries fairly do enclose
  Of orient pearl a double row;
Which when her lovely laughter shows,
  They look like rosebuds filled with snow.
Yet them no peer nor prince [can]3 buy
Till "Cherry ripe", themselves do cry.

Her eyes like angels watch them still;
  Her brows like bended bows do stand,
Threat'ning with piercing frowns to kill
  All that [attempt]4 with eye or hand
[Those]5 sacred cherries to come nigh
Till "Cherry ripe", themselves do cry.


View original text (without footnotes)
1 Moeran: "blow"
2 Moeran: "grow"
3 Moeran: "may"
4 Ireland, Moeran: "approach"
5 Ireland, Moeran: "These"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Willow song [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): DUT GER

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


Lay a garland on my hearse,
  Of the dismal yew,
Maidens, willow branches [bear]1,
  Say I died true.

My love was false, but I was firm
  [From my hour of birth;]2
Upon my buried body lie
  Lightly, [gentle]3 earth.


View original text (without footnotes)
1 Pearsall, A. Taylor: "wear"
2 omitted by Pearsall and A. Taylor
3 Pearsall, A. Taylor: "thou gentle"

Submitted by Ted Perry

3. The constant lover [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

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For her gait, if she be walking;
Be she sitting, I desire her
For her state's sake; and admire her
For her wit if she be talking;
	Gait and state and wit approve her;
	
For which all and each I love her.
Be she sullen, I commend her
For a modest. Be she merry,
For a kind one her prefer I.
Briefly everything doth lend her
	So much grace, and so approve her,
	That for everything I love her.


Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. The passionate shepherd [ sung text checked 1 time]

Language: English

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Come live with me and be my Love,
And we will all the pleasures prove
[That hills and valleys, dales and field,
Or woods or steepy mountain yields]1.

[And we will sit upon the rocks]2
And see the shepherds feed their flocks,
By shallow rivers, to whose falls
Melodious birds sing madrigals.

[And I will]3 make thee beds of roses
[And]4 a thousand fragrant posies,
A cap of flowers, and [a]5 kirtle
Embroider'd all with leaves of myrtle.

[A gown made of the finest]6 wool,
Which from our pretty lambs we pull,
[Fair linèd slippers]7 for the cold,
With buckles of the purest gold.

A belt of straw and ivy buds
[With coral clasps and amber studs:]8
[And if these pleasures may thee move,
Come live with me and be my Love]9.

[ ... ]

View original text (without footnotes)
First published in England's Helicon, 1600
1 Fine: "That hills and valleys, dales and fields,/ Or woods or steepy mountain yields." ; Moeran: "That grove or valley, hill or field,/ Or wood and steepy mountain yield"; Webbe: "That grove and valley, hill and field/ Or woods and steepy mountains yield"
2 Moeran: "Where we will sit on rising rocks"; Webbe: "There will we sit upon the rocks"
3 Moeran: "Pleased will I"; Webbe: "There will I"
4 Moeran, Webbe: "And twine"
5 Moeran, Webbe: "rural"
6 Moeran: "A jaunty gown of finest"
7 Moeran: "And shoes lined choicely"
8 Webbe: "A coral clasp and amber studs"; omitted by Fine.
9 Moeran: "If these, these pleasures can thee move,/ Then live with me and be my love."; Webbe: "And if these pleasures may thee move,/ Then live with me and be my love

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

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