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Incipit Lamentatio Jeremiae Prophetae

Language: Latin

Incipit Lamentatio Jeremiae Prophetae

Aleph. Quomodo sedet sola civitas plena populo!
Facta est quasi vidua domina gentium;
princeps provinciarum facta est sub tributo.

Beth. Plorans ploravit in nocte, et lacrymae ejus in maxillis ejus;
non est qui consoletur eam, ex omnibus charis ejus;
omnes amici ejus spreverunt eam, et facti sunt ei inimici.1

Ghimel. Migravit Juda propter afflictionem, et multitudinem servitutis;
habitavit inter gentes, nec invenit requiem;
omnes persecutores ejus apprehenderunt eam inter angustias.

Daleth. Viae Sion lugent, eo quod non sint qui veniant ad solemnitatem;
omnes portae ejus destructae, sacerdotes ejus gementes;
virgines ejus squalidae, et ipsa oppressa amaritudine.

He. Facti sunt hostes ejus in capite, inimici ejus locupletati sunt,
quia Dominus locutus est super eam propter multitudinem iniquitatum ejus;
parvuli ejus ducti sunt in captivitatem ante faciem tribulantis.1


Translation(s): FRE

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View original text (without footnotes)
1 Tallis adds: "Ierusalem, Ierusalem, convertere ad Dominum Deum tuum."

Submitted by Guy Laffaille [Guest Editor]

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • FRE French (Fran├žais) (Guy Laffaille) , title 1: "Première leçon de ténèbres du Mercredi saint pour une basse", copyright © 2011, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Text added to the website: 2011-09-19.
Last modified: 2014-09-11 14:15:34
Line count: 16
Word count: 130

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