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Quid videbis in Sulamite, nisi choros...

Language: Latin

1  Quid videbis in Sulamite, nisi choros castrorum?
   Quam pulchri sunt gressus tui in calceamentis, filia principis!
   Juncturæ femorum tuorum sicut monilia
   quæ fabricata sunt manu artificis.
2  Umbilicus tuus crater tornatilis,
   numquam indigens poculis.
   Venter tuus sicut acervus tritici vallatus liliis.
3  Duo ubera tua sicut duo hinnuli,
   gemelli capreæ.
4  Collum tuum sicut turris eburnea;
   oculi tui sicut piscinæ in Hesebon
   quæ sunt in porta filiæ multitudinis.
   Nasus tuus sicut turris Libani,
   quæ respicit contra Damascum.
5  Caput tuum ut Carmelus;
   et comæ capitis tui sicut purpura regis
   vincta canalibus.
6  Quam pulchra es, et quam decora,
   carissima, in deliciis!
7  Statura tua assimilata est palmæ,
   et ubera tua botris.
8  Dixi: Ascendam in palmam,
   et apprehendam fructus ejus;
   et erunt ubera tua sicut botri vineæ,
   et odor oris tui sicut malorum.
9  Guttur tuum sicut vinum optimum,
   dignum dilecto meo ad potandum,
   labiisque et dentibus illius ad ruminandum.
10 Ego dilecto meo,
   et ad me conversio ejus.
11 Veni, dilecte mi, egrediamur in agrum,
   commoremur in villis.
12 Mane surgamus ad vineas:
   videamus si floruit vinea,
   si flores fructus parturiunt,
   si floruerunt mala punica;
   ibi dabo tibi ubera mea.
13 Mandragoræ dederunt odorem
   in portis nostris omnia poma:
   nova et vetera, dilecte mi, servavi tibi.


Translation(s): ENG

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Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]

Settings in other languages or adaptations:


Text added to the website: 2014-11-07.
Last modified: 2014-11-07 11:11:31
Line count: 40
Word count: 208

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How beautiful are thy feet with shoes

Language: English after the Latin

1  How beautiful are thy feet with shoes, 
   O prince's daughter! 
   the joints of thy thighs are like jewels, 
   the work of the hands of a cunning workman.
2  Thy navel is like a round goblet, 
   which wanteth not liquor: 
   thy belly is like an heap of wheat set about with lilies.
3  Thy two breasts are like two young roes 
   that are twins.
4  Thy neck is as a tower of ivory; 
   thine eyes like the fishpools in Heshbon, 
   by the gate of Bath-rabbim: 
   thy nose is as the tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus.
5  Thine head upon thee is like Carmel, 
   and the hair of thine head like purple; 
   the king is held in the galleries.
6  How fair and how pleasant art thou, 
   O love, for delights!
7  This thy stature is like to a palm tree, 
   and thy breasts to clusters of grapes.
8  I said, I will go up to the palm tree, 
   I will take hold of the boughs thereof: 
   now also thy breasts shall be as clusters of the vine, 
   and the smell of thy nose like apples;
9  And the roof of thy mouth like the best wine for my beloved, 
   that goeth down sweetly, 
   causing the lips of those that are asleep to speak.
10 I am my beloved's, 
   and his desire is toward me.
11 Come, my beloved, let us go forth into the field; 
   let us lodge in the villages.
12 Let us get up early to the vineyards; 
   let us see if the vine flourish, 
   whether the tender grape appear, 
   and the pomegranates bud forth: 
   there will I give thee my loves.
13 The mandrakes give a smell, 
   and at our gates are all manner of pleasant fruits, 
   new and old, which I have laid up for thee, O my beloved.


H. Skempton sets lines 6, 10

About the headline (FAQ)

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Authorship


Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)


Text added to the website: 2014-11-07.
Last modified: 2017-02-17 15:11:40
Line count: 39
Word count: 305