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Procesión

Language: Spanish (Español)

I. Procesión
 Por la calleja vienen
 extraños unicornios.
 ¿De qué campo,
 de qué bosque mitológico?
 Más cerca,
 ya parecen astrónomos.
 Fantásticos Merlines
 y el Ecce Homo,
 Durandarte encantado.
 Orlando furioso.

II. Paso
 Virgen con miriñaque,
 virgen de la Soledad,
 abierta como un inmenso
 tulipán.
 En tu barco de luces
 vas
 por la alta marea
 de la ciudad,
 entre saetas turbias
 y estrellas de cristal.
 Virgen con miriñaque
 tú vas
 por el río de la calle,
 ¡hasta el mar!

III. Saeta
 Cristo moreno
 pasa
 de lirio de Judea
 a clavel de España.

 ¡Miradlo, por dónde viene!

 De España.
 Cielo limpio y oscuro,
 tierra tostada,
 y cauces donde corre
 muy lenta el agua.
 Cristo moreno,
 con las guedejas quemadas,
 los pómulos salientes
 y las pupilas blancas.

 ¡Miradlo, por dónde va!


Translation(s): ENG FRE

List of language codes

Submitted by Ivo Zandhuis

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Richard Gard) , "Holy Week procession", copyright © 2010, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , "Procession", copyright © 2016, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Text added to the website: 2005-01-11.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:02:11
Line count: 42
Word count: 128

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Holy Week procession

Language: English after the Spanish (Español)

1. Procession
 Down the road come
 strange unicorns.
 From what fields,
 what mythological woods?
 Circling closer
 They look like astronomers.
 Ghostly Merlins
 and the condemned Christ,
 Enchanted Durandarte,
 Orlando Furioso.
 
2. Paso (large platform carrying a statue used in holy processions)
 Virgin with glittering crinoline skirts,
 virgin of solitude,
 Opening like an immense
 tulip.
 In your boat of lights
 you sail
 with the high tide
 of the city,
 among gypsy songs
 and crystal stars.
 Virgin with glittering crinoline skirts,
 you float
 on the river of the street -
 to the sea!
 
3. Saeta (gypsy processional song for Holy Week)
 The swarthy Christ
 transforms
 from the lily of Judea
 to the carnation of Spain.

 Look where he's coming from!

 From Spain,
 the sky, clean and dark,
 the earth scorched,
 and ditches where
 water runs very slowly.
 Swarthy Christ,
 his locks of hair burned,
 his cheekbones protruding
 and his pupils white.

 Look where he's going!


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Authorship

  • Translation from Spanish (Español) to English copyright © 2010 by Richard Gard, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.

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Based on

 

Text added to the website: 2010-02-03.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:03:33
Line count: 42
Word count: 153