by Anonymous / Unidentified Author

Fond Wanton youths
Language: English 
    οὐκ ἔστι γήμας ὅστις οὐ χειμάζεται,
    λέγουσι πάντες· καὶ γαμοῦσιν εἰδότες.
            --Anthol. Græc.

Fond wanton youths make love a God
Which after proveth Age’s rod;
Their youth, their time, their wit, their art
They spend in seeking of their smart;
And, which of follies is the chief,
They woo their woe, they wed their grief.

All find it so who wedded are,
Love’s sweets, they find, enfold sour care;
His pleasures pleasing’st in the eye,
Which tasted once with loathing die:
They find of follies ’tis the chief,
Their woe to woo, to wed their grief.

If for their own content they choose
Forthwith their kindred’s love they lose;
And if their kindred they content,
For ever after they repent;
O ’tis of all our follies chief,
Our woe to woo, to wed our grief.

In bed, what strifes are bred by day,
Our puling wives do open lay;
None friends, none foes we must esteem
But whom they so vouchsafe to deem:
O ’tis of all our follies chief,
Our woe to woo, to wed our grief.

Their smiles we want if aught they want,
And either we their wills must grant
Or die they will, or are with child;
Their longings must not be beguiled:
O ’tis of all our follies chief,
Our woe to woo, to wed our grief.

Foul wives are jealous, fair wives false,
Marriage to either binds us thrall;
Wherefore being bound we must obey
And forcèd be perforce to say, —
Of all our bliss it is the chief,
Our woe to woo, to wed our grief.

Authorship

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Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website: 2014-02-23
Line count: 39
Word count: 266