by William Allingham (1824 - 1889)

I walked in the lonesome evening
Language: English 
I walked in the lonesome evening, 
And who so sad as I, 
When I saw the young men and maidens 
Merrily passing by. 

To thee, my Love, to thee --
So fain would I come to thee ! 
While the ripples fold upon sands of gold, 
And I look across the sea. 

I stretch out my hands ; who will clasp them ? 
I call, -- thou repliest no word. 
Oh, why should heart-longing be weaker 
Than the waving wings of a bird ! 

To thee, my Love, to thee --
So fain would I come to thee ! 
For the tide's at rest from east to west, 
And I look across the sea. 

There 's joy in the hopeful morning, 
There 's peace in the parting day, 
There 's sorrow with every lover 
Whose true love is far away. 

To thee, my Love, to thee --
So fain would I come to thee ! 
And the water's bright in a still moonlight, 
As I look across the sea. 

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Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website: 2009-01-19
Line count: 24
Word count: 165