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Four songs for baritone or bass with piano after poems by Conrad Ferdinand Meyer

Word count: 348

Song Cycle by Hans Erich Pfitzner (1869 - 1949)

Original language: Vier Lieder für Bariton oder Bass mit Klavier nach Gedichten von Conrad Ferdinand Meyer

1. Hus's dungeon

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Conrad Ferdinand Meyer (1825 - 1898), "Hussens Kerker"
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Emil Mattiesen, Hans Erich Pfitzner, Armin Schibler. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


 My end draws near,
 my case and the verdict are now
 out of the hands of man
 and before the throne of God.
 Already borne by the clouds,
 surrounded by his Host,
 the Son of Man stands before me.
 
 This dungeon I will praise,
 the dungeon - it is good!
 The windowbars, a cross of iron,
 looks out upon the fresh waters,
 and between its bars
 I can see a sail hovering.
 Above in the blue, the snow rests.
 
 How near I feel the water,
 as if I lay submerged therein,
 with wondrous cool
 would my body be steeped -
 I also see a bunch of grapes
 with red leaves
 hanging in from the window.
 
 It is time to rejoice!
 A great peace draws near!
 A flock of herons there turns
 toward eternal Spring.
 They know paths and bridges,
 they know their way -
 what, my soul, do you fear?


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

2. Sower's saying

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Conrad Ferdinand Meyer (1825 - 1898), "Säerspruch" FRE IRI
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Willy Burkhard, Oskar von Chelius, Hans Fleischer, Eusebius Mandyczewski, Hans Erich Pfitzner, Armin Schibler, Anna Teichmüller, Viktor Ullmann, Karl Weigl, Julius Weismann. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


 Measure your stride! Measure your sweep!
 The earth will remain young for a long time yet!
 There a grain falls, dead and at rest.
 Rest is sweet and good for it.
 Here is one that has broken through the earth.
 It is good for it. Sweet is the light.
 And not one falls from this world;
 and each one falls as God desires.


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

3. Soaking oars

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Conrad Ferdinand Meyer (1825 - 1898), "Eingelegte Ruder" FRE
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Volkmar Andreae, Hermann Behn, Jan Pieter Hendrik van Gilse, Siegmund von Hausegger, Hans Erich Pfitzner, Willy Rössel, Armin Schibler, Julius Spengel, Oskar Ulmer, Felix Wolfes. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


My soaking oars drip;
drops fall slowly into the depths.

There was nothing to irritate me!
There was nothing to delight me!
A painless Today is running down.

Below me - alas! vanished from the light -
the fairest of my hours already dream.

From the blue depths, Yesterday calls:
"Are my many sisters still in the light?"


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

4.

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © 2016 by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Conrad Ferdinand Meyer (1825 - 1898), "Laß scharren deiner Rosse Huf!"
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Hermann Behn, Ernst Markees, Hans Erich Pfitzner, Bernhard Ernst Scholz, Julius Weismann. Go to the text.

Go to the single-text view


Do not go, you whom God created for me!
Let the hooves of your horses scratch the ground 
At the call to journey!

You would flee my hearth?
Not even knowing where, oh where
Your horses will take you!

The hours are flying! Life is dashing past!
We have said nothing yet to each other --
Stay, until dawn!

You must flee from my arms?
Not even knowing where, oh where
Your horses will take you...


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

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