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Drie geestelijke liederen

Word count: 150

Song Cycle by Henk Badings (1907 - 1987)

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1. When Christ was born

Language: English

Authorship

  • by Anonymous / Unidentified Author

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[--- This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. ---]

2. I sing of a maiden [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English after the Middle English

Authorship


Based on

See other settings of this text.


I sing of a maiden
That matchless is.
King of all Kings
Was her Son iwis1.

He came all so still,
Where His mother was
As dew in April
That falleth on the grass:

He came all so still,
To His mother's bower
As dew in April
That falleth on flower.

He came all so still,
Where His mother lay
As dew in April
That formeth on spray.

Mother and maiden
Was ne'er none but she:
Well may such a lady
God's mother be.


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1 iwis = certainly

Submitted by Geoffrey Wieting

3. Adam lay ybounden [ sung text not yet checked against a primary source]

Language: English

Translation(s): FRE GER

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Authorship


See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • FRE French (Fran├žais) (Guy Laffaille) , copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) [singable] (Bertram Kottmann) , copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Adam lay ybounden1,
Bounden in a bond,
Four thousand winter
Thought he not too long;

And all was for an apple,
An apple that he took,
As clerkës finden
Written in their book.

Né had [one]2 apple taken been,
The apple taken been,
Né had never Our Lady
A been Heaven's Queen.

Blessèd be the time
That apple takèn was.
Therefore we moun singen:
Deo gratias!


View original text (without footnotes)
1 Britten uses "Deo gracias! Deo gracias!" as the opening line and repeats it throughout.
2Ireland: "the"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

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