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Four Elizabethan Songs

Word count: 464

Song Cycle by Vivian Fine (1913 - 2000)

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1. Daybreak [ sung text verified 1 time]

Language: English

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Stay, O sweet, and do not rise ;
The light, that shines comes from thine eyes ;
The day breaks not, it is my heart,
Because that you and I must part.
  Stay, or else my joys will die,
  And perish in their infancy.

[ ... ]

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Spring's welcome [ sung text verified 1 time]

Language: English

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What bird so sings, yet so does wail?
O 'tis the ravish'd nightingale.
Jug, jug, jug, tereu! she cries,
And still her woes at midnight rise.
Brave prick-song! Who is't now we hear?
None but the lark so shrill and clear;
Now at heaven's gate she [claps]1 her wings, 
The morn not waking till she sings.
Hark, hark, with what a pretty throat 
Poor robin redbreast tunes his note:
Hark how the jolly cuckoos sing
Cuckoo! to welcome in the spring!
Cuckoo! to welcome in the spring!


View original text (without footnotes)
1 Fine: "clasps"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. Dirge [ sung text verified 1 time]

Language: English

Translation(s): DUT DUT FIN FRE GER GER GER GER GER GER GER GER GER GER ITA NOR NOR SWE

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • DUT Dutch (Nederlands) (Jan Jonk) , "Kom toch gauw, kom toch gauw, dood", copyright © 2012, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FIN Finnish (Suomi) (Paavo Cajander)
  • GER German (Deutsch) [singable] (David Paley) , "Komm herbei, komm herbei, Tod", copyright © 2012, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Paolo Montanari) , "Vieni, o morte", copyright © 2010, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • NOR Norwegian (Bokmål) (Marianne Beate Kielland) , "Kom hit, kom nå hit, død", copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


[Come away, come away, death]1,
  And in sad cypress let me be laid;
Fly away, fly away, breath;
  I am slain by a fair cruel maid.
My shroud of white, stuck all with yew,
  [O prepare it!]2
My part of death, no one so true
  Did share it.

[ ... ]

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Fortner: "Death, come away, come away"
2 Dring: "Come prepare it"
3 Leguerney: "thrown"; Wilkinson: "strewn"
4 Leguerney: "strown"
5 omitted by Korngold
6 omitted by Argento.
7 Amram: "did share it." [mistake?]

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. The bargain [ sung text verified 1 time]

Language: English

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My true love hath my heart, and I have his,
  By just exchange one [for another]1 given:
I hold his dear, and mine he cannot miss,
  There never was a better bargain driven:
      My true love hath my heart, and I have his.
 
His heart in me keeps him and me in one,
  My heart in him his thoughts and senses guides:
He loves my heart, for once it was his own,
  I cherish his because in me it bides:
      My true love hath my heart, and I have his.


View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with Francis T. Palgrave, ed. (1824-1897), The Golden Treasury., 1875, as "A ditty"

Parodied in Archibald Stodart-Walker's My true friend hath my hat.

1 Parry: "to the other"

Note: Somervell's setting has several changes to the punctuation (as supplied by Mike Pearson):

Line One: No first comma
Line Two: "giv'n" and full stop not colon
Line Three: No first comma
Line Four: "driv'n" and full stop not colon
Line Five: No first comma
Line Seven: Full stop not colon
Line Eight: Full stop not colon
Line Ten: No first comma

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

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