English Lyrics, First Set

by Charles Hubert Hastings Parry, Sir (1848 - 1918)

Word count: 474

1. My true love hath my heart [sung text checked 1 time]

My true love hath my heart, and I have his,
  By just exchange one [for another]1 given:
I hold his dear, and mine he cannot miss,
  There never was a better bargain driven:
      My true love hath my heart, and I have his.
 
His heart in me keeps him and me in one,
  My heart in him his thoughts and senses guides:
He loves my heart, for once it was his own,
  I cherish his because in me it bides:
      My true love hath my heart, and I have his.

Authorship

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View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with Francis T. Palgrave, ed. (1824-1897), The Golden Treasury., 1875, as "A ditty"

Parodied in Archibald Stodart-Walker's My true friend hath my hat.

1 Parry: "to the other"

Note: Somervell's setting has several changes to the punctuation (as supplied by Mike Pearson):

Line One: No first comma
Line Two: "giv'n" and full stop not colon
Line Three: No first comma
Line Four: "driv'n" and full stop not colon
Line Five: No first comma
Line Seven: Full stop not colon
Line Eight: Full stop not colon
Line Ten: No first comma

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Good Night! ah! no; the hour is ill that severs those it should unite [sung text not yet checked]

Good-night? ah! no; the hour is ill
Which severs those it should unite;
Let us remain together still,
Then it will be good night.

How can I call the lone night good,
Though thy sweet wishes wing its flight?
Be it not said, thought, understood --
Then it will be -- good night.

To hearts which near each other move
From evening close to morning light,
The night is good; because, my love,
They never say good-night. 

Authorship

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CZE Czech (Čeština) (Jaroslav Vrchlický) , "Dobrou noc!", Prague, J. Otto, first published 1901
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Ferdinando Albeggiani) , "Buona notte", copyright © 2013, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ROM Romanian (Română) (Panait Cema) , "Noapte bună (după Shelley)"

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. Where shall the lover rest, whom the fates sever from his true maiden's breast [sung text checked 1 time]

Where shall the lover rest,
  Whom the fates sever
From his true maiden's breast,
  Parted for ever?
Where, through groves deep and high,
  Sounds the far billow,
Where early violets die,
  Under the willow.

CHORUS.
 Eleu loro, &c. Soft shall be his pillow.

There, through the summer day,
  Cool streams are laving;
There, while the tempests sway,
  Scarce are boughs waving;
There, thy rest shalt thou take,
  Parted for ever,
Never again to wake,
  Never, O never!

CHORUS.
 Eleu loro, &c. Never, O never!

Where shall the traitor rest,
  He the deceiver,
Who could win maiden's breast,
  Ruin, and leave her ?
In the lost battle,
  Borne down by the flying,
Where ingles wars rattle,
  With groans of the dying;

CHORUS.
 Eleu loro, &c. Soft shall be his pillow.

Her wing shall the eagle flap,
  O'er the false hearted,
This warm blood the wolf shall lap,
  E're life be parted.
Shame and dishonor sit
  By his grave ever,
Blessing shall hallow it
  Never, O never !

CHORUS.
 Eleu loro, &c. Soft shall be his pillow.

Authorship

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Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

4. Willow, willow, willow [sung text checked 1 time]

Desdemona
 The poor soul sat sighing by a sycamore tree,
 Sing all a green willow:
 Her hand on her bosom, her head on her knee,
 Sing willow, willow, willow:
 The fresh streams ran by her, and murmur'd her moans;
 Sing willow, willow, willow;
 Her salt tears fell from her, and soften'd the stones;

 [Lay by these:--]1

 Sing willow, willow, willow;

 [Prithee, hie thee; he'll come anon:--]1

 Sing all a green willow [must be my garland.]2

 [Sing all a green willow;]3

 [Let nobody blame him; his scorn I approve,-]4

 [Nay, that's not next.--Hark! who is't that knocks? 

Emilia:
 It's the wind.]1

Desdemona:
 [Sing willow, willow, willow,]3
 [I call'd my love false love; but what said he then? 
 Sing willow, willow, willow:
 If I court moe women, you'll couch with moe men!]4
 [Sing willow, willow, willow,]3

Authorship

Based on

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

View original text (without footnotes)
1 not set by Fortner, Korngold, Parry, Vaughan Williams
2 Korngold: "my garland must be"
3 added by Korngold
4 not set by Parry, Vaughan Williams; Fortner: "I'd called my love false love, but what did he say? / Sing willow, willow willow,/ If I court moe women, you'll couch with moe men!"

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]