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Der Abend

Language: German (Deutsch)

Senke, strahlender Gott, die Fluren dürsten
Nach erquickendem Tau, der Mensch verschmachtet,
  Matter ziehen die Rosse,
    Senke den Wagen hinab!

Siehe, wer aus des Meers krystallner Woge
Lieblich lächelnd dir winkt! Erkennt dein Herz sie?
  Rascher fliegen die Rosse.
    Thetys, die göttliche, winkt.

Schnell vom Wagen herab in ihre Arme
Springt der Führer, den Zaum ergreift Kupido,
  Stille halten die Rosse,
    Trinken die kühlende Flut.

An dem Himmel herauf mit leisen Schritten
Kommt die duftende Nacht; ihr folgt die süße
  Liebe. Ruhet und liebet!
    Phöbus, der Liebende, ruht.


Translation(s): DUT ENG FRE

List of language codes

View text with footnotes

Submitted by Emily Ezust

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Emily Ezust) , title 1: "Evening", copyright ©
  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , title 1: "Le soir", copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • DUT Dutch (Nederlands) [singable] (Lau Kanen) , title 1: "De avond", copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.

Last modified: 2015-07-07 17:13:30
Line count: 16
Word count: 88

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Evening

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Sink, beaming God; the meadows thirst
for refreshing dew, Man is listless,
  the horses are pulling more slowly:
    the chariot descends.

Look who beckons from the sea's crystal waves,
smiling warmly! Does your heart know her?
  The horses fly more quickly.
    Thetis, the divine, is beckoning.

Quickly from the chariot and into her arms
springs the driver. Cupid grasps the reins.
  The horses come silently to a halt
    and drink from the cool waters.

In the sky above, with a soft step,
comes the fragrant night; she is followed by sweet
  Love. Rest and love!
    Phoebus, the amorous, rests.


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View text with footnotes

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Friedrich von Schiller (1759 - 1805), "Der Abend", subtitle: "Nach einem Gemählde" DUT FRE
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Johannes Brahms, Robert Kahn, Nikolaus, Freiherr von Krufft, Lenhuk, Carl Ludwig Amand Mangold, Paul Gerhard Natorp, Wilhelm Riem, Richard Georg Strauss. Go to the text.

 

Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.

Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:01:49
Line count: 16
Word count: 99