by Walter Scott, Sir (1771 - 1832)

O, hush thee, my babie, thy sire was a...
Language: English 
O, hush thee, my [babie]1, thy sire was a knight,
Thy mother a lady, both [lovely]2 and bright;
The woods and the glens, from the [towers]3 which we see,
They are all belonging, dear [babie]1, to thee.
    [O ho ro, i ri ri, cadul gu lo.]4
 
O, fear not the bugle, [though]5 loudly it blows,
It calls but the [warders]6 that guard thy repose;
Their bows would be bended, their blades would be red,
Ere the step of a foeman draws near to thy bed.
    [O ho ro, i ri ri, cadul gu lo.]4
 
O, hush thee, my [babie]1, the time soon will come,
When thy sleep shall be broken [by]7 trumpet and drum;
Then hush thee, my [darling]1, take rest while you may,
For strife comes with manhood, and waking with day.
    [O ho ro, i ri ri, cadul gu lo.]4

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Gade: "baby"
2 Sullivan: "gentle"
3 Gade: "tow’r"; Sullivan: "tow’rs"
4 Omitted by Sullivan; replaced with "O sleep, o sleep!" by Gade
5 Gade: "tho’"
6 Gade: "wand’rers" (possible typo)
7 Gade: "with"

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

  • Also set in French (Français), a translation by Anonymous/Unidentified Artist GER ; composed by Niels Wilhelm Gade.
  • Also set in German (Deutsch), a translation by Ferdinand Freiligrath (1810 - 1876) , "Wiegenlied für den Sohn eines schottischen Häuptlings" ; composed by Niels Wilhelm Gade, Adolf Jensen.

Researcher for this text: Sharon Krebs [Guest Editor]

Text added to the website: 2007-11-22 00:00:00
Last modified: 2016-05-05 16:51:37
Line count: 15
Word count: 142