by Percy Bysshe Shelley (1792 - 1822)
Translation by Árpád Tóth (1886 - 1928)

I met a traveller from an antique land
Language: English 
Available translation(s): ITA
I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: Two vast [and]1 trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive (stamped on these lifeless things,)
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed:
And on the pedestal these words appear:
"[My name is]2 Ozimandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!"
Nothing besides remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.

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Confirmed with The Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley, Volume 2, London, George Bell & Sons, 1892, page 294.

1 omitted by Manno.
2 Manno: "I am"

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

  • Also set in German (Deutsch), a translation by E. von Griesbach , "Ozymandias" ; composed by Max Wiedmann.
  • Also set in Russian (Русский), a translation by Konstantin Dmitrevich Bal'mont (1867 - 1942) , "Озимандия", first published 1896 ; composed by Leonid Leonidovich Lisovsky, Borys Mykolayovych Lyatoshynsky, Aleksandr Afanasievich Spendiarov.

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]
Ozymandiás
Language: Hungarian (Magyar)  after the English 
Egy messzi vándor jött, ki ős romok 
felől regélt: A pusztán szörnyü két 
nagy csonka láb áll. Arrább lágy homok 
lep egy kőarcot. Homloka setét. 
A vont ajk vén parancsszóktól konok 
s vad szenvedélye még kivésve ég 
a hűs kövön, bár, mely véste, a kéz, 
s a szív, hol dúlt e dölyf, temetve rég. 
A talpkövön kevély igék sora: 
„Király légy bár, jöjj és reszketve nézz: 
nevem Ozymandiás, urak ura.”
Más semmi jel. A roppant rom körül 
határtalan szélesre s hosszura 
a holt homoksík némán szétterül.

Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

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Researcher for this text: Andrew Schneider [Guest Editor]