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Vorbei, vorbei zu Feld und Wald

Language: German (Deutsch)

Vorbei, vorbei zu Feld und Wald
zu Roß in wilder Eile,
was willst du schwebende Gestalt
mit deinem Wink zur Weile?

Mein Bett ist nicht auf grüner Haid
und nicht im schatt'gen Walde,
es wartet mein die schönste Maid
und Liebe ruft: "komm balde!"

Laß ab, laß ab begleitend Weib,
dein Arm ist viel zu luftig,
dein Blick zu todt, dein schlanker Leib
zu kalt und nebelduftig.

Mein Lieb hat weiß'ren Arm als du,
hat Augen wie zwei Sterne,
und küßt und herzt und lacht dazu.
Was drohst du mir von ferne?

Der Reiher kreischt, es schlägt das Roß
die blutgespornten Flanken,
das Weib wird dreist und riesengroß
und wilder die Gedanken.

Vorbei, vorbei wie Fittig rauscht,
es nickt herab vom Baume,
es huscht und hascht, es lugt und lauscht,
schon greift sie nach dem Zaume.

Jetzt hat sie seinen Arm gefaßt,
umher beginnt's zu dunkeln,
es schwillt herauf, es drückt die Last,
des Weibes Augen funkeln.

Zwei Sprünge vom gestürzten Thier,
da liegt im dunkeln Walde
der Reiter todt im Arme ihr
und Liebe ruft: "komm balde!"


Translation(s): ENG

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Submitted by Harry Joelson

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English [singable] (Constance Bache) (William Stigand, né Stigant) , title 1: "The witch of the forest"


Text added to the website: 2008-01-02.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:02:15
Line count: 32
Word count: 178

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The witch of the forest

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Away, my steed, thro' wood and storm,
And slack not in the springing,
Avaunt! O ghostly beck'ning form,
That to my side art clinging!

I cannot stay, my bed tonight
Is not in forest dreary,
For me awaits a lady bright,
"Come quick!" cries love, "I'm weary."

Avaunt! O warlock weird, avaunt!
Thy look it glows so grimly;
Thine arm is meagre, long and gaunt,
Thy body grey looms dimly;

My love hath whiter arms than thou,
Her eyes like stars beam mildly,
Her smile it lights both lip and brow,
Why threat'nest thou so wildly?

The Heron croaks loud, the good steed sighs
With flanks all red with spurring,
The witch grows up to giant size,
The rider's thoughts go whirring.

Away! away! the wings they brush,
The trees they nod and sidle,
A thousand wild things gush and rush,
She catches at the bridle,

Now she hath caught his arm quite fast,
It seems around to darkle,
He grasps and clutches then at last,
The witch's eyes they sparkle:

All riderless the good steed flies,
And there, in forest dreary,
In her embrace the dead lord lies -
"Come quick," cries love, "I'm weary!


Note: from a Rubinstein score. It is unclear which of the two translators listed on the front page wrote this particular translation.
Submitted by Harry Joelson

Authorship


Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Gustav von Boddien (1814 - 1870), "Die Waldhexe"
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Paul Mirsch, Anton Grigoryevich Rubinstein, Friedrich von Wickede. Go to the text.

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Text added to the website: 2011-06-26.
Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:04:26
Line count: 32
Word count: 196