A Child's Vision

Song Cycle by Ronald A. Beckett

Word count: 646

1. Little Boy Blue  [sung text not yet checked]

The little toy dog is covered with dust,
   But sturdy and stanch he stands;
And the little toy soldier is red with rust,
   And his musket moulds in his hands.
Time was when the little toy dog was new,
   And the soldier was passing fair;
And that was the time when our Little Boy Blue
   Kissed them and put them there.

"Now, don't you go till I come," he said,
   "And don't you make any noise!"
So, toddling off to his trundle-bed,
   He dreamt of the pretty toys;
And, as he was dreaming, an angel song
   Awakened our Little Boy Blue---
Oh! the years are many, the years are long,
   But the little toy friends are true!

Ay, faithful to Little Boy Blue they stand,
   Each in the same old place---
Awaiting the touch of a little hand,
   The smile of a little face;
And they wonder, as waiting the long years through
   In the dust of that little chair,
What has become of our Little Boy Blue,
   Since he kissed them and put them there. 

Authorship

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Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Wynken, Blynken, and Nod (A Dutch Lullaby) [sung text not yet checked]

Wynken, Blynken and Nod one night
  Sailed off in a wooden shoe --
Sailed on a river of crystal light
  Into a sea of dew.
"Where are you going and what do you wish?"
  The old moon asked the three.
"We have come to fish for the herring fish
  That live in this beautiful sea;
  Nets of silver and gold have we!"
    Said Wynken,
    Blynken,
    And Nod.

The old moon laughed and sang a song,
  As they rocked in the wooden shoe,
And the wind that sped them all night long
  Ruffled the waves of dew.
The little stars were the herring fish
  That lived in that beautiful sea --
"Now cast your nets wherever you wish --
  Never afeard are we!"
  So cried the stars to the fishermen three:
    Wynken,
    Blynken,
    and Nod.

All night long their nets they threw
  To the stars in the twinkling foam.
Then down from the skies came the wooden shoe,
  Bringing the fishermen home.
'Twas all so pretty a sail it seemed
  As if it could not be
And some folks thought 'twas a dream they'd dreamed
  Of sailing that beautiful sea --
  But I shall name you the fishermen three:
    Wynken,
    Blynken,
    and Nod.

Wynken and Blynken are two little eyes,
  And Nod is a little head,
And the wooden shoe that sailed the skies
  Is a wee one's trundle bed.
So shut your eyes while mother sings
  Of wonderful [sights]1 that be,
And you shall see the beautiful things
  As you rock in the misty sea,
  Where the old shoe rocked the fishermen three:
    Wynken,
    Blynken,
    and Nod.

Authorship

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View original text (without footnotes)
The 1910 edition has "Dutch Lullaby" as a subtitle.
1 Lewin: "things"

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

3. Seven times one [sung text not yet checked]

There's no dew left on the daisies and clover,
    There's no rain left in heaven.
I 've said my "seven times" over and over, --
    Seven times one are seven.
 
I am old, -- so old I can write a letter;
    My birthday lessons are done.
The lambs play always, -- they know no better;
    They are only one times one.
 
O Moon! in the night I have seen you sailing
    And shining so round and low.
You were bright -- ah, bright -- but your light is failing;
    You are nothing now but a bow.
 
You Moon! have you done something wrong in heaven,
    That God has hidden your face?
I hope, if you have, you will soon be forgiven,
    And shine again in your place.
 
O velvet Bee! you 're a dusty fellow, --
    You 've powdered your legs with gold.
O brave marsh Mary-buds, rich and yellow,
    Give me your money to hold!
 
O Columbine! open your folded wrapper,
    Where two twin turtle-doves dwell!
O Cuckoo-pint! toll me the purple clapper
    That hangs in your clear green bell!
 
And show me your nest with the young ones in it, --
    I will not steal them away;
I am old! you may trust me, linnet, linnet!
    I am seven times one to-day.

Authorship

Confirmed with The World’s Best Poetry, ed. by Bliss Carman, et al., Philadelphia: John D. Morris & Co., 1904.


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]