Drei Emily Dickinson Lieder

Translations © by Bertram Kottmann

Song Cycle by William Keith Rogers (b. 1921)

Word count: 146
Original language: Three Songs from Emily Dickinson
1. Lightly stepped a yellow star [sung text not yet checked]
Lightly stepped a yellow star
To its lofty place,
Loosed the Moon her silver hat
From her lustral face.
All of evening softly lit
As an astral hall -
"Father," I observed to Heaven,
"You are punctual."

Authorship

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • GER German (Deutsch) (Bertram Kottmann) , copyright © 2018, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]
by Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)
1.
Sacht betrat ein gelber Stern
seinen Himmelsfleck,
Luna zog das Silbertuch
vor ihrem Lächeln weg.
Abendhimmel matt erhellt 
wie ein Sternensaal -
„Vater“, sagte ich hinauf,
„pünktlich, Dein Signal.“

Authorship

  • Translation from English to German (Deutsch) copyright © 2018 by Bertram Kottmann, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you must ask the copyright-holder(s) directly for permission. If you receive no response, you must consider it a refusal.

    Bertram Kottmann.  Contact: BKottmann (AT) t-online.de

    If you wish to commission a new translation, please contact:

Based on


This text was added to the website: 2018-05-09
Line count: 8
Word count: 29

Translation © by Bertram Kottmann
2. I like to see it lap the miles [sung text not yet checked]
I like to see it lap the miles,
And lick the valleys up,
And stop to feed itself at tanks;
And then, prodigious, step

Around a pile of mountains,
And, supercilious, peer
In shanties by the sides of roads;
And then a quarry pare

To fit its [sides]1, and crawl between,
Complaining all the while
In horrid, hooting stanza;
Then chase itself down hill

And neigh like Boanerges;
Then, punctual as a star,
Stop - docile and omnipotent -
At its own stable door.

Authorship

See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , copyright © 2016, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) (Bertram Kottmann) , copyright © 2017, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Getty, Perle: "ribs"

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]
by Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)
2.
Gern seh ich, wie sie Meilen frisst
und leckt die Täler auf
und hält an Tanks, Wasser zu ziehn;
hernach - gewalt’ger Schritt

umfährt sie Berg und Hügel,
hochnäsig blickt sie dann
in Hütten längs der Bahn,
gräbt sich drauf in den Fels,

so breit sie ist, und kriecht hindurch,
klagt schon die ganze Zeit
ihr gräulich heulend Lied;
dann donnert sie bergab

wiehert wie Boanerges*;
dann, pünktlich wie ein Stern
hält sie, fügsam, allmächtig,
an ihrem Schuppen dann. 

Authorship

  • Translation from English to German (Deutsch) copyright © 2017 by Bertram Kottmann, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you must ask the copyright-holder(s) directly for permission. If you receive no response, you must consider it a refusal.

    Bertram Kottmann.  Contact: BKottmann (AT) t-online.de

    If you wish to commission a new translation, please contact:

Based on

Translation of title "The railway train" = "Die Eisenbahn"
* Mk 3, 17

This text was added to the website: 2017-09-22
Line count: 16
Word count: 79

Translation © by Bertram Kottmann
3. The heart asks pleasure first [sung text not yet checked]
The heart asks pleasure - first,
And then excuse from pain.
And then those little anodynes
That deaden suffering.

And then, to go to sleep;
And then, if it should be
The will of its Inquisitor,
The liberty to die.

Authorship

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , "Le Cœur réclame le Plaisir - d'abord", copyright © 2009, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) (Walter A. Aue) , copyright © 2010, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) (Bertram Kottmann) , copyright © 2014, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]
by Emily Dickinson (1830 - 1886)
3.
Erst sucht das Herz die Lust,
hernach Freiheit von Schmerz;
und dann die kleinen Mittelchen,
die töten jeden Schmerz.

Dann sucht es seinen Schlaf;
und dann, falls dies sollt’ sein
der Wille dessen, der's vernimmt,
die Freiheit heimzugehn.

Authorship

  • Translation from English to German (Deutsch) copyright © 2014 by Bertram Kottmann, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you must ask the copyright-holder(s) directly for permission. If you receive no response, you must consider it a refusal.

    Bertram Kottmann.  Contact: BKottmann (AT) t-online.de

    If you wish to commission a new translation, please contact:

Based on


This text was added to the website: 2014-08-16
Line count: 8
Word count: 38

Translation © by Bertram Kottmann