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The LiederNet Archive

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It is illegal to copy and distribute our copyright-protected material without permission.
Printing texts or translations without the name of the author or translator is also illegal.
You must use the copyright symbol © when you reprint copyright-protected material.

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An eine Äolsharfe

Language: German (Deutsch)

Angelehnt an die Efeuwand 
Dieser alten Terrasse,
Du, einer luftgebor'nen Muse
Geheimnisvolles Saitenspiel,
Fang' an,
Fange wieder an 
Deine melodische Klage!
Ihr kommet, Winde, fern herüber,
Ach! von des Knaben,
Der mir so lieb war,
Frischgrünendem Hügel.
Und Frühlingsblüten [unterwegs]1 streifend,
Übersättigt mit Wohlgerüchen,
Wie süß, wie süß bedrängt ihr dies Herz!
Und säuselt her in die Saiten,
Angezogen von wohllautender Wehmut,
Wachsend im Zug meiner Sehnsucht,
Und hinsterbend wieder.
Aber auf einmal,
Wie der Wind heftiger herstößt,
Ein holder Schrei der Harfe
Wiederholt mir zu süßem Erschrecken
Meiner Seele plötzliche Regung,
Und hier, die volle Rose streut geschüttelt
All' ihre Blätter vor meine Füße!


Translation(s): DUT ENG FRE FRE ITA ITA

List of language codes

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Brahms: "unterweges"
Note: the poem is preceded by a quotation from Horace:
   Tu semper urges fleblilibus modis
   Mysten ademptum: nec tibi Vespere
   Surgente decedunt amores,
   Nec rapidum fugiente Solem.

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (Emily Ezust) , title 1: "To an aeolian harp", copyright ©
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Ferdinando Albeggiani) , title 1: "A un'arpa Eolia", copyright © 2008, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , title 1: "À une harpe éolienne", copyright © 2011, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • FRE French (Français) (Stéphane Goldet) (Pierre de Rosamel) , title 1: "A une harpe éolienne", copyright © 2012, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • DUT Dutch (Nederlands) [singable] (Lau Kanen) , title 1: "Aan een eolusharp", copyright © 2014, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Paolo Pupillo) , title 1: "Ad una arpa eolica", copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.

Last modified: 2014-06-25 00:15:40

Line count: 25
Word count: 105

Gentle Reminder
This website began in 1995 as a personal project, and I have been working on it full-time without a salary since 2008. Our research has never had any government or institutional funding, so if you found the information here useful, please consider making a donation. Your gift is greatly appreciated.
     - Emily Ezust

To an aeolian harp

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

Leaning up against the ivy-covered wall
Of this old terrace,
You, an air-borne muse,
A lute-melody full of mystery,
Begin,
Begin again,
Your melodious lament!
You come, winds, from far away,
Ah! from the boy 
Who was so dear to me,
From his hill so freshly green.
On your way, streaking over spring blossoms
Saturated with sweet scents,
How sweetly, how sweetly you besiege my heart!
You rustle the strings here,
Drawn by harmonious melancholy,
Growing louder in the pull of my longing,
And then dying down again.
But all at once,
The wind blows violently
And a lovely cry of the harp
Echoes, to my sweet terror,
The sudden stirring of my soul,
And here, the ample rose shakes and strews
All its petals at my feet!


IMPORTANT NOTE: The material directly above is protected by copyright and appears here by special permission. If you wish to copy it and distribute it, you must obtain permission or you will be breaking the law. Once you have permission, you must give credit to the author and display the copyright symbol ©. Copyright infringement is a criminal offense under international law.

Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Eduard Mörike (1804 - 1875), from Gedichtsammlung, first published 1838 DUT FRE FRE ITA ITA
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Johannes Brahms, Pater Theo Flury, Werner M. Grimmel, Emil Kauffmann, Fritz Schieri, Wolfgang Weller, Hugo Wolf. Go to the text.

 

Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.

Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:01:42

Line count: 25
Word count: 128