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Es ragt ins Meer der Runenstein

Language: German (Deutsch)

Es ragt ins Meer der Runenstein,
da sitz' ich mit meinen Träumen.
Es pfeift der Wind, die Möwen schrein,
die Wellen, die wandern und schäumen.

Ich habe geliebt manch schönes Kind
und manchen guten Gesellen -
Wo sind [sie]1 hin? Es pfeift der Wind,
es schäumen und wandern die Wellen.


Translation(s): DAN ENG ENG ENG ENG ROM RUS RUS

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About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Bretan: "die"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Authorship


Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):


Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.

Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:01:32
Line count: 8
Word count: 50

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The runestone juts into the sea

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

 The runestone juts into the sea,
 and I sit there with my dreams.
 The wind whistles and the seagulls shriek;
 and the waves, they wander and foam.
 
 I have loved many a fair girl
 and made many good friends -
 where have they gone? The wind whistles,
 and the waves foam and wander.


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Authorship

  • Translation from German (Deutsch) to English copyright © by Emily Ezust

    Emily Ezust permits her translations to be reproduced without prior permission for printed (not online) programs to free-admission concerts only, provided the following credit is given:

    Translation copyright © by Emily Ezust,
    from the LiederNet Archive -- http://www.lieder.net/

    For any other purpose, please write to the e-mail address below to request permission and discuss possible fees.

    licenses (AT) lieder (DOT) net
    (licenses at lieder dot net)



Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Heinrich Heine (1797 - 1856), no title, appears in Neue Gedichte, in Verschiedene, in Seraphine, no. 14 DAN ROM RUS RUS
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Conrad Johan Bartholdy, Konstantin Julius Becker, Johann Bohus, János Bókay, Nicolae Bretan, Carl Debrois van Bruyck, Felix Draeseke, Richard Farber, Don Forsythe, Robert Franz, Rich. Grelling, Edvard Grieg, Ferdinand Gumbert, L. Gundlach, jun., Georg Hartmann, Friedrich Hinrichs, Oswald Horlacher, Robert von Hornstein, Ludvig Irgens-Jensen, Emil Kauffmann, Johanna Kinkel, Henning Karl Adam von Koss, Conrad Kühner, Peter Erasmus Lange-Müller, Hermann Lorenzen, Ernst Löwenberg, Friedrich August Naubert, Emil Naumann, Béla Nemes Hegyi, Th. Niemann, Joseph Pache, Julius Posse, Julius Postl, Bruno Ramann, Heinrich Reinhardt, August Schultz, Oscar George Theodore Sonneck, Heinrich Spangenberg, Wilhelm Stehle, Václav Jan Křtitel Tomášek, Nándor Zsolt. Go to the text.

 

Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.

Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:01:32
Line count: 8
Word count: 54