The Mob Within the Heart

Song Cycle by Sergius Kagen (1909 - 1964)

Word count: 468

?. Pain has an element of blank [sung text not yet checked]

Pain — has an Element of Blank —
It cannot recollect
When it begun — or if there were
A time when it was not —

It has no Future — but itself —
Its Infinite realms contain
Its Past — enlightened to perceive
New Periods — of Pain. 

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • GER German (Deutsch) (Walter A. Aue) , copyright © 2010, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • ITA Italian (Italiano) (Ferdinando Albeggiani) , copyright © 2011, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

?. The right to perish [sung text not yet checked]

The right to perish might be thought
An undisputed right,
Attempt it, and the Universe upon the opposite
Will concentrate its officers -
You cannot even die,
But Nature and Mankind must pause
To pay you scrutiny.

Authorship

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

?. Mine enemy is growing old [sung text not yet checked]

Mine enemy is growing old, -
I have at last revenge.
The palate of the hate departs;
If any would avenge, -

Let him be quick, the viand flits,
It is a faded meat.
Anger as soon as fed is dead;
'T is starving makes it fat.

Authorship

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

?. From Blank to Blank [sung text not yet checked]

From Blank to Blank -
A Threadless Way
I pushed Mechanic feet -
To stop - or perish - or advance -
Alike indifferent -

If end I gained
It ends beyond
Indefinites disclosed -
I shut my eyes - and groped as well
'Twas lighter - to be Blind -

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?. I felt a cleavage in my mind [sung text not yet checked]

I felt a [cleavage]1 in my mind
As if my brain had split;
I tried to match it seam by seam,
But could not make it fit.

The thought behind I strove to join
Unto the thought before
But sequence ravelled out of reach
Like balls upon a floor.

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • GER German (Deutsch) (Walter A. Aue) , copyright © 2010, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

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1 in some editions of Dickinson: "cleaving"

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

?. Remorse is memory awake [sung text not yet checked]

Remorse is memory awake,
Her companies astir, -
A presence of departed acts
At window and at door.

It's past set down before the soul,
And lighted with a match,
Perusal to facilitate
Of its condensed despatch.

Remorse is cureless, - the disease
Not even God can heal;
For 't is his institution, -
The complement of hell.

Authorship

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

?. Much madness is divinest sense [sung text not yet checked]

Much madness is divinest sense
To [a]1 discerning eye;
Much sense the starkest madness.
'Tis the majority
In this, as all, prevails.
Assent, and you are sane,
Demur, - you're straightaway dangerous,
And handled with a chain.

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , copyright © 2016, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) (Walter A. Aue) , copyright © 2010, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) (Bertram Kottmann) , copyright © 2017, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Langert : "the"

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

?. My God, what is a heart? [sung text not yet checked]

I Cannot ope mine eyes,
            But thou art ready there to catch
            My morning-soul and sacrifice:
Then we must needs for that day make a match.

		            My God, what is a heart?
            Silver, or gold, or precious stone,
            Or starre, or rainbow, or a part
Of all these things, or all of them in one?
	
		            My God, what is a heart?
            That thou shouldst it so eye, and wooe,
            Powring upon it all thy art,
As if that thou hadst nothing els to do?

		            Indeed mans whole estate
            Amounts (and richly) to serve thee:
            He did not heav'n and earth create,
Yet studies them, not him by whom they be.

		            Teach me thy love to know;
            That this new light, which now I see,
            May both the work and workman show:
Then by a sunne-beam I will climbe to thee.

Authorship

Note: this is sometimes misattributed to Emily Dickinson, who copied the second and third stanzas into one of her notebooks. The lines were mistakenly thought to be her work and published under her name.

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]