Seven songs

Song Cycle by Francis George Scott (1880 - 1958)

Word count: 765

1. The Old Fisherman [sung text checked 1 time]

Greet the bights that gave me shelter
 [ ... ]

Authorship

This text may be copyright, so we will not display it until we obtain permission to do so or discover it is public-domain.

Confirmed with www.scottishpoetrylibrary.org.uk/poem/old-fisherman/.


2. Gane is the day [sung text not yet checked]

Gane is the day, and mirk's the night,
But we'll ne'er stray for faut o' light,
For ale and brandy's stars and moon,
And blude-red wine's the risin sun.

Chorus:
Then guidwife count the lawin, 
      The lawin, the lawin,
Then guidwife count the lawin, 
      And bring a coggie mair.

There's wealth and ease for gentlemen,
And semple folk maun fecht and fen’;
But here we're a' in ae accord,
For ilka man that's drunk's a lord.

My coggie is a haly pool,
That heals the wounds o' care and dool;
And Pleasure is a wanton trout:
An ye drink it a', ye'll find him out!

Authorship

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

Confirmed with The Complete Poems and Songs of Robert Burns, edited by James Barke with an Introduction by John Cairney, Collins, Glasgow 1995, Page 530.


Researcher for this text: Iain Sneddon [Guest Editor]

3. Reid-E'en [sung text checked 1 time]

Ilka hert an’ hind are met
 [ ... ]

Authorship

This text may be copyright, so we will not display it until we obtain permission to do so or discover it is public-domain.
View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with The Complete Poems of Hugh MacDiarmid, Volume 1, edited by Michael Grieve and W R Aitken, Penguin Books, Middlesex, 1985, Page 26.

1 Scott: "Love"

4. In time of tumult [sung text not yet checked]

The thunder and the dark
Dwindle and disappear:
The free song of the lark
Tumbles in air.

The froth of the wave-drag
Falls back from the pool:
Sheer out of the crag
Lifts the white gull.

Heart! keep your silence still
Mocking the tyrant’s mock:
Thunder is on the hill:
Foam on the rock.

Authorship

Confirmed with William Soutar, Poems in Scots and English, selected by W R Aitken, Scottish Academic Press, Edinburgh, 1972, page 30


Researcher for this text: Iain Sneddon [Guest Editor]

5. The Kerry Shore - Loch Fyne [sung text checked 1 time]

Blow, good wind, from Westward, blow against the dawn
 [ ... ]

Authorship

This text may be copyright, so we will not display it until we obtain permission to do so or discover it is public-domain.

6. The Cameronian Cat [sung text not yet checked]

There was a Cameronian cat
Was hunting for a prey,
And in the house she catch'd a mouse
Upon the Sabbath-day.

The Whig, being offended
At such an act profane,
Laid by his book, the cat he took,
And bound her in a chain.

“Thou damn'd, thou cursed creature,
This deed so dark with thee,
Think'st thou to bring to hell below
My holy wife and me?

Assure thyself that for the deed
Thou blood for blood shalt pay,
For killing of the Lord's own mouse
Upon the Sabbath-day.”

The presbyter laid by the book,
And earnestly he pray'd
That the great sin the cat had done
Might not on him be laid.

And straight to execution
Poor baudrons she was drawn,
And high hang'd up upon a tree -
Mess John sung a psalm.

And when the work was ended,
They thought the cat near dead;
She gave a paw, and then a mew,
And stretched out her head.

“Thy name”, said he, “shall certainly
A beacon still remain,
A terror unto evil ones
For evermore, Amen.”

Authorship

Confirmed with The Jacobite Relics of Scotland; being the Songs, Airs, and Legends of the Adherents to the House of Stewart, collected and illustrated by James Hogg, William Blackwood, Edinburgh, 1819, Page 37.


Researcher for this text: Iain Sneddon [Guest Editor]

7. Macpherson's farewell [sung text not yet checked]

Farewell, ye dungeons dark and strong,
The wretch's destinie!
McPherson's1 time will not be long,
On yonder gallows-tree.
   Sae rantingly, sae wantonly,
   Sae dauntingly gae'd he:
   He play'd a spring, and danc'd it round
   Below the gallows-tree.

O what is death but parting breath?
On many a bloody plain
I've dar'd his face, and in this place
I scorn him yet again!
   Sae rantingly, sae wantonly...

Untie these bands from off my hands,
And bring to me my sword[;]2
And there 's no a man in all Scotland,
But I'll brave him at a word.
   Sae rantingly, sae wantonly...

I've liv'd a life of sturt and strife; 
I die by treacherie:
It burns my heart I must depart
And not avenged be.
   Sae rantingly, sae wantonly...

Now farewell, light, thou sunshine bright,
And all beneath the sky!
May coward shame distain his name,
The wretch that dares not die!
   Sae rantingly, sae wantonly...

Authorship

See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • CZE Czech (Čeština) (Josef Václav Sládek) , "Mac Phersonovo loučení"
  • FRE French (Français) (Pierre Mathé) , "L'adieu de McPherson", copyright © 2014, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

View original text (without footnotes)
1 in some editions, "M'Pherson"
2 in some editions, ","
sturt = trouble

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]