by Walter Scott, Sir (1771 - 1832)
Translation by Auguste-Jean-Baptiste Defauconpret (1767 - 1843)

The barefooted friar
Language: English 
I’ll give thee, good fellow, a twelvemonth or twain,
To search Europe through, from Byzantium to Spain;
But ne’er shall you find, should you search till you tire,
So happy a man as the Barefooted Friar.

Your knight for his lady pricks forth in career,
And is brought home at even-song prick’d through with a spear;
I confess him in haste — for his lady desires
No comfort on earth save the Barefooted Friar’s.

Your monarch? — Pshaw! many a prince has been known
To barter his robes for our cowl and our gown,
But which of us e’er felt the idle desire
To exchange for a crown the grey hood of a Friar!

The Friar has walk’d out, and where’er he has gone,
The land and its fatness is mark’d for his own;
He can roam where he lists, he can stop when he tires,
For every man’s house is the Barefooted Friar’s.

He’s expected at noon, and no wight till he comes
May profane the great chair, or the porridge of plums
For the best of the cheer, and the seat by the fire,
Is the undenied right of the Barefooted Friar.

He’s expected at night, and the pasty’s made hot,
They broach the brown ale, and they fill the black pot,
And the goodwife would wish the goodman in the mire,
Ere he lack’d a soft pillow, the Barefooted Friar.

Long flourish the sandal, the cord, and the cope,
The dread of the devil and trust of the Pope;
For to gather life’s roses, unscathed by the briar,
Is granted alone to the Barefooted Friar. 

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Text added to the website: 2019-05-03 00:00:00
Last modified: 2019-05-03 01:12:11
Line count: 28
Word count: 268

Le joyeux frère
Language: French (Français)  after the English 
Prenez un an, prenez-en deux
Courez la France et l'Angleterre
Quel homme y trouverez—vous heureux ?
Le joyeux Frère

Un guerrier meurt au champ d‘honneur
Sa veuve, hélas ! se désespère
Quel sera son consolateur ?
Le joyeux Frère

Que désire pour son guerdon
Le prince à son heure dernière ?
C‘est le froc et le capuchon
Du joyeux Frère

Riche et pauvre, brave et poltron
Chacun le fête et le révère
Chaque maison est la maison
Du joyeux Frère

Le mari lui donne en tous lieux
A table la place première
Et la femme traite encor mieux
Le joyeux Frère

Du diable, pour braver le choc
Pour semer de fleurs sa carrière
Vivent la sandale et le froc
Du joyeux Frère !

Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)


Researcher for this text: Guy Laffaille [Guest Editor]

Text added to the website: 2019-05-03 00:00:00
Last modified: 2019-05-07 11:34:29
Line count: 24
Word count: 123