by Paul Bourget (1852 - 1935)
Translation Singable translation by M. Louise Baum

Voici que le printemps, ce fils léger...
Language: French (Français) 
Available translation(s): ENG
Voici que le printemps, ce fils léger d'Avril,
Beau page en pourpoint vert brodé de roses blanches.
Paraît, leste, fringant, et les poings sur les hanches,
Comme un prince acclamé revient d'un long exil.

Les branches des buissons verdis rendent étroite
La route qu'il poursuit en dansant comme un fol;
Sur son épaule gauche il porte un rossignol,
Un merle s'est posé sur son épaule droite.

Et les fleurs qui dormaient sous les mousses des bois
Ouvrent leurs yeux où flotte une ombre vague et tendre,
Et sur leurs petits pieds se dressent, pour entendre
Les deux oiseaux siffler et chanter à la fois.

Car le merle sifflote et le rossignol chante :
Le merle siffle ceux qui ne sont pas aimés,
Et pour les amoureux languissants et charmés,
Le rossignol prolonge une chanson touchante.

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Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English [singable] (M. Louise Baum) , "Comes the spring"
  • ENG English (John Glenn Paton) , copyright © 2010, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Line count: 16
Word count: 135

Comes the spring
Language: English  after the French (Français) 
Across the hilltops comes the spring, blithe April's son!
In doublet, broidered green, White roses sewn between!
He laughs lightly! With hand on hip advances brightly!
Comes to his own like a monarch, his long weary exile done!

The leafy branches crowd along the n arrow byways,
Where comes the lusty lad, He dances there like mad!
He bears a nightingale high on one shoulder hale,
The other bears a blackbird, piping boldly skyways.

And the flow'rs who were sleeping 'mid the mossy wood
Unveil their eyes where shadows are vague and tender,
See them standing on tiptoe straight, there eager ears surrender,
List'ning the two birds singing together the while!

For the blackbird doth pipe And the nightingale chanteth,
The blackbird, whistling, jeers at the lovelorn youth,
And for those in Love's paradise, of smiling lips and eyes,
Nightingale all the wood with melody enchanteth!

From the Schirmer edition of Debussy (1954).

Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Researcher for this text: Harry Joelson

This text was added to the website: 2010-02-07
Line count: 16
Word count: 146