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The LiederNet Archive

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Es hat die Rose sich beklagt

Language: German (Deutsch) after the Azerbaijani (Azərbaycan dili)

Es hat die Rose sich beklagt,
Daß gar zu schnell der Duft [vergehe]1
Den ihr den Lenz gegeben habe.
Da hab' ich ihr zum Trost gesagt,
Daß er durch meine Lieder wehe,
Und [dort]2 ein ew'ges Leben habe.


Translation(s): ENG FRE RUS

List of language codes

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Urspruch: "verwehe"
2 Mandyczewski: "drin"

Submitted by Emily Ezust [Administrator]

Authorship


Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:

Other available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English [singable] (Constance Bache) (William Stigand, né Stigant) , "The rose"
  • FRE French (Français) (Guy Laffaille) , copyright © 2016, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Text added to the website: 2003-11-19 00:00:00.

Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:02:00

Line count: 6
Word count: 38

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The rose

Language: English after the German (Deutsch)

The rose, the rose did sweet complain,
That all too soon her scent was waning,
Which late the spring had given to her.
And then I said, to ease her pain,
That in my song she now was reigning,
With life immortal to her given!


Note: from a Rubinstein score. It is unclear which of the two translators listed on the front page wrote this particular translation.
Submitted by Harry Joelson

Authorship


Based on
  • a text in German (Deutsch) by Friedrich Martin von Bodenstedt (1819 - 1892), no title, appears in Die Lieder des Mirza-Schaffy, in Zuléikha, no. 10 FRE GER RUS
      • This text was set to music by the following composer(s): Heinrich Böie, Ferdinand Oskar Eichberg, Robert Franz, Oscar Fretzdorff, Ludwig Grünberger, Hans Huber, Ludwig Liebe, Frank Leland Limbert, Eusebius Mandyczewski, Heinrich Reimann, Hermann Julius Richter, Anton Grigoryevich Rubinstein, Louis Samson, Arthur Smolian, Anton Urspruch, H. Weimar. Go to the text.

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]


Text added to the website: 2011-06-23 00:00:00.

Last modified: 2014-06-16 10:04:26

Line count: 6
Word count: 45