by Matthew Arnold (1822 - 1888)

Come to me in my dreams, and then
Language: English 
Come to me in my dreams, and then
By day I shall be well again!
For [then]1 the night will more than pay
The hopeless longing of the day.

Come, as thou cam'st a thousand times,
A messenger from radiant climes,
And smile on thy new world, and be
As kind to [all the rest as]2 me.

Or, as thou never cam'st in sooth,
Come now, and let me dream it truth;
And part my hair, and kiss my brow,
And say - My love! why [sufferest]3 thou? 

Come to me in my dreams, and then
By day I shall be well again!
For [then]1 the night will more than pay
The hopeless longing of the day.

About the headline (FAQ)

View original text (without footnotes)

Confirmed with Empedocles on Etna, and Other Poems B Fellowes, London, 1852, Page 83.

1 Emery: "so"
2 Emery and Somervell: "others as to"
3 Bridge: "suff'rest"

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)


Research team for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator] , Ted Perry , Iain Sneddon [Guest Editor]

Text added to the website between May 1995 and September 2003.
Last modified: 2019-07-05 17:00:37
Line count: 16
Word count: 117