by Blaise Pascal (1623 - 1662)
Translation by W. F. Trotter

Nonobstant ces misères, l'homme veut...
Language: French (Français) 
Nonobstant ces misères, l'homme veut être heureux, 
et ne veut être qu'heureux, et ne peut ne vouloir pas l'être;
mais comment s'y prendra-t-il? Il faudrait, pour bien faire, 
qu'il se rendît immortel; mais, ne le pouvant, 
il s'est avisé de s'empêcher d'y penser.

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Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

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Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

This text was added to the website: 2003-10-20
Line count: 5
Word count: 43

Despite these miseries, man wishes to be...
Language: English  after the French (Français) 
Despite these miseries, man wishes to be happy, 
and only wishes to be happy, and cannot wish not to be so.
But how will he set about it? To be happy he would have to
make himself immortal. But, not being able to do so, 
it has occurred to him to prevent himself from thinking of death.

About the headline (FAQ)

Confirmed with Blaise Pascal, Thoughts, translated by W.F. Trotter, New York: P.F. Collier & Son, 1910, page 64, number 169.

Note: the line-breaks are arbitrary. This is prose.

Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)


Research team for this text: Auditorium du Louvre , Sharon Krebs [Guest Editor]

This text was added to the website: 2003-10-20
Line count: 5
Word count: 57