by Anonymous / Unidentified Author
Translation © by David Wyatt

Moribus et genere
Language: Latin 
Available translation(s): ENG
triplum
 Moribus et genere Christo
 Conjuncte Johannes,
 Huc ades affluereque jube dictaminis aures
 Exercet plebs ista chorus tibi,
 Carmina pangit,
 Angelicos tangit coetus cantando decoros.
 
 Carne viror, sed mente cruor,
 Sunt haec tibi dotes,
 Corde nitor, sermone decor,
 Coeli scala pontes.
 Virginitate fruens,
 Niveo candore notare,
 Te laudant olei profusae corpore guttae.
 
Motetus
 Virgo, virga virens,
 Vires virtutibus affer.
 Arteriisque pluens cantorum guttura profer,
 Ut bene conjuncte concordi voce canentum
 Astra sonent coelique boent
 Hic nectare fontes.
 
 Pectora, Christe,
 Tui nimio venerando decore
 Discipuli pectus tetigit pietatis honore;
 Pectore discipulus Domini
 Cenando Johannes
 Incubat et leves dulcis sopor occupat artus.
 
 Circumfulsit eum rerum cognitio clara
 Et patris hic filium cognovit origine mira
 Extasis haec felix,
 Haec visio certe beata,
 Qua nexus cujusque patet
 Cognitio tanta!

 Gaudet ecclesia, laetetur chorus et omnes
 Laetentur populi per climata cuncta beandi.
 Divinio divitiis nunc afflue,
 Divio dives,
 Hujus et obsequiis plus donativa quae vives.

Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

Available translations, adaptations, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • ENG English (David Wyatt) , title 1: "By way of life and by family", copyright © 2012, (re)printed on this website with kind permission


Researcher for this text: Guy Laffaille [Guest Editor]

This text was added to the website: 2009-01-08
Line count: 38
Word count: 150

By way of life and by family
Language: English  after the Latin 
Triplum
 By way of life and by family joined
 To Christ, o John,
 Be present here and order all ears to pay attention to your words.
 The people themselves in chorus practice for you,
 They compose songs,
 They touch the noble angelic hosts with their singing.

 Thriving in body, strong of mind1,
 These are your gifts;
 Shining of heart, noble in speech,
 The ladder and bridge to heaven;
 Rejoicing in virginity,
 Well-known for your snowy purity,
 The very drops of oil lavished on your body praise you.

Motetus
 Virgin, vicar of vigour, 
 Victor in virtue2, 
 Open the throats of us singers, flowing in our larynxes,
 So that the stars may ring with our joined voices as we sing
 In harmony, and the fountains of heaven 
 May resound with its sweetness.

 O Christ, the heart
 Of your disciple touched our hearts by the faithfulness of his piety,
 A virtue to be much honoured;
 The disciple beloved of his Lord,
 John, settled down to eat
 And sweet sleep overtook his light limbs.

 A clear understanding of everything shone around him
 And he recognised the Son of the Father by his miraculous origin;
 This trance was fruitful,
 This vision certainly blessed,
 By which the connection of everything was revealed,
 Such great knowledge!

 The church is glad, the choir rejoices and all
 Peoples rejoice, those to be blessed in every region.
 Now pour out greater rewards in divinity and dignity, 
 Distinguished Dijon3,
 And may you live with the obedience that this man showed.

View original text (without footnotes)
1 literally, "green-growth in body, blood in mind" -- perhaps a contrast like "gentle in body, but a sharp and combative intellect" is intended?
2 literally, "Virgin, flourishing branch, / Add strength to your virtues"
3 literally, "greater rewards in divinity & wealth, / rich Dijon"

Authorship

  • Translation from Latin to English copyright © 2012 by David Wyatt, (re)printed on this website with kind permission. To reprint and distribute this author's work for concert programs, CD booklets, etc., you may ask the copyright-holder(s) directly or ask us; we are authorized to grant permission on their behalf. Please provide the translator's name when contacting us.
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This text was added to the website: 2012-07-03
Line count: 38
Word count: 249