Five Childhood Lyrics

Song Cycle by John (Milford) Rutter, CBE (b. 1945)

Word count: 506

German (Deutsch) translation: Fünf Lieder aus der Welt der Kinder ( Bertram Kottmann)

1. Monday's child [sung text checked 1 time]

Monday's child, Tuesday's child,
Wednesday's child, Thursday's child,
Friday's child, Saturday's child,
Sunday's child.

Monday's child is fair of face, 
Tuesday's child is full of grace,
Wednesday's child is full of woe, 
Thursday's child has far to go,
Friday's child is loving and giving, 
Saturday's child works hard for his living,
And the child that is born on the Sabbath day
Is bonny and blithe and good and gay. 

Monday's child, Tuesday's child,
Wednesday's child, Thursday's child,
Friday's child, Saturday's child,
Sunday's child.

Authorship

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • GER German (Deutsch) (Bertram Kottmann) , "Montagskind", copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

Researcher for this text: Bertram Kottmann

2. The Owl and the Pussycat [sung text not yet checked]

I
The Owl and the Pussycat went to sea
In a beautiful pea-green boat,
They took some honey, and plenty of money,
Wrapped up in a five pound note.
The Owl looked up to the stars above,
And sang to a small guitar,
"O lovely Pussy! O Pussy, my love,
What a beautiful [Pussy]1 you are, 
you are, 
you are!
What a beautiful Pussy you are."

II
Pussy said to the Owl "You elegant fowl, 
How charmingly sweet you sing.
O let us be married, too long we have tarried;
But what shall we do for a ring?"
They sailed away, for a year and a day,
To the land where the Bong-tree grows,
And there in a wood a Piggy-wig stood
With a ring [at]2 the end of his nose, 
his nose, 
his nose,
With a ring [at]1 the end of his nose.

III
"Dear Pig, are you willing to sell for one shilling your ring?"
Said the Piggy, "I will"
So they took it away, and were married next day
By the Turkey who lives on the hill.
They dined on mince, and slices of quince,
Which they ate with a runcible spoon.
And hand in hand, on the edge of the sand.
They danced by the light of the moon, 
the moon, 
the moon,
They danced by the light of the moon.

Authorship

See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • GER German (Deutsch) (Bertram Kottmann) , "Der Eul’ und die Miezekatz", copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • RUS Russian (Русский) [singable] (Dmitri Nikolaevich Smirnov) , "Совёнок и Кошечка", copyright © 1982, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Harmati: "puss"
2 Wilkinson: "in"

Research team for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator] , Garrett Medlock [Guest Editor]

3. Windy nights [sung text not yet checked]

Whenever the moon and the stars are set,
Whenever the wind is high,
All night long in the dark and wet,
A man goes riding by.

Late in the night when the fires are out,
Why does he gallop and gallop about?
Whenever the trees are crying aloud,
And ships are tossed at sea,

By, on the highway, low and loud,
By at the gallop goes he.
By at the gallop he goes, and then
By he comes back at the gallop again.

Authorship

See other settings of this text.

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • FRE French (Français) (Sylvain Labartette) , "Nuit venteuse", copyright © 2007, (re)printed on this website with kind permission
  • GER German (Deutsch) [singable] (Bertram Kottmann) , copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

Researcher for this text: Ted Perry

4. Matthew, Mark, Luke and John [sung text checked 1 time]

Matthew, Mark, Luke and John,
Bless the bed that I lie on.
Four corners to my bed,
Four angels round my head;
One to watch, and one to pray,
And two to bear my soul away.

Authorship

Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • GER German (Deutsch) (Bertram Kottmann) , "Matthäus, Markus, Lukas und Johann", copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

Researcher for this text: Bertram Kottmann

5. Sing a song of sixpence [sung text checked 1 time]

Sing a song of sixpence,
A pocket full of rye.
Four and twenty blackbirds,
Baked in a pie.
When the pie was opened,
The birds began to sing;1
[Wasn't]2 that a dainty dish,
To set before the king?
The king was in his counting house,3
Counting out his money;
The queen was in the parlour,
Eating bread and honey.
The maid was in the garden,
Hanging out the clothes;
When down came a blackbird
And [snapped]4 off her nose. 

Authorship

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • GER German (Deutsch) (Bertram Kottmann) , "Singt das Lied vom Sixpence", copyright © 2015, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Here Malotte adds: "Caw! Caw!"
2 Malotte: "was not"
3 Malotte adds: "one, two, three, four, (ha, ha, ha, ha!)"
4 Malotte: "pecked"

Research team for this text: Bertram Kottmann , Garrett Medlock [Guest Editor]