Hebdomade

Song Cycle by John Linton Gardner (1917 - 2011)

Word count: 613

1. Sweet Suffolk Owl [sung text not yet checked]

Sweet Suffolk Owl, so trimly dight
With feathers like a lady bright,
Thou singest alone, sitting by night,
  Te whit, te whoo! Te whit, te whoo!

The note, that forth so freely rolls,
With shrill command the mouse controls;
And sings a dirge for dying souls,
  Te whit, te whoo! Te whit, te whoo!

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Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

2. Fain would I change that note  [sung text not yet checked]

Fain would I change that note
To which fond Love hath charm'd me
Long, long to sing by rote,
Fancying that that harm'd me:

Yet when this thought doth come
'Love is the perfect sum 
Of all delight!'
I have no other choice
Either for pen or voice
To sing or write.

O Love! they wrong thee much
That say thy [fruit]1 is bitter,
When thy [rich]2 fruit is such
As nothing can be sweeter.

Fair house of joy and bliss,
Where truest pleasure is,
I do adore thee:
I know thee what thou art,
I serve thee with my heart,
And fall before thee.

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View original text (without footnotes)
1 Hume, Mulholland, Orr, Quilter: "sweet"
2 Hume: "ripe"

Research team for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator] , Ted Perry

3. Weep you no more, sad fountains [sung text not yet checked]

Weep you no more, sad fountains;
  What need [you]1 flow so fast?
Look how the snowy mountains
  Heaven's sun doth gently waste!
    But my sun's heavenly eyes
      View not your weeping,
      That now lies sleeping,
    [Softly now, softly]2 lies
        Sleeping.

Sleep is a reconciling,
  A rest that peace begets;
Doth not the sun rise smiling
  When fair at [e'en]3 he sets?
    Rest you, then, rest, sad eyes!
      Melt not in weeping,
      While she lies sleeping,
    [Softly now, softly]2 lies
        Sleeping.

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

  • GER German (Deutsch) (Julia Hamann) , "Tränen", copyright © 2007, (re)printed on this website with kind permission

View original text (without footnotes)
1 van Dieren: "ye"
2 van Dieren, Holst, Moeran: "Softly, now softly"
3 Parry: "eve"; Moeran, Quilter, van Dieren: "even"; Holst: "ev'n"

Researcher for this text: Ted Perry

4. A Sparrow-Hawk proud did hold in wicked jail [sung text not yet checked]

A Sparrow-Hawk proud did hold in wicked jail
Music's sweet chorister, the nightingale,
To whom with sighs she said: "O set me free!
And in my song I'll praise no bird but thee."
The hawk replied, "I will not lose my diet
To let a thousand such enjoy their quiet."

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Lyrics from the Song-Books of the Elizabethan Age, ed. by A. H. Bullen, London, John C. Nimmo, 1887, page 2.

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

5. Mother, I will have a husband [sung text not yet checked]

Mother, I will have a husband,
And I will have him out of hand.
Mother, I will sure have one,
In spite of her that will have none.

John-a-Dun should have had me long ere this,
He said I had good lips to kiss.
Mother, I will sure have one,
In spite of her that will have none.

For I have heard 'tis trim when folks do love,
By good Sir John I swear I'll prove.
My other I will sure have one,
In spite of her that will have none.

To the town therefore will I gad,
To get me a husband good or bad.
Mother I will have a husband,
And I will have him out of hand.

Mother, I will sure have one,
In spite of her that will have none.

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Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]

6. Interlude 

— This text is not currently
in the database but will be added
as soon as we obtain it. —

Authorship

  • by Anonymous / Unidentified Author

7. It was a lover and his lass [sung text not yet checked]

It was a lover and his lass,
  With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino
That o'er the green [corn-field]1 did pass.
  In [the]2 spring time, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding a ding;
Sweet lovers love the spring.

[Between the acres of the rye,
  With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
These pretty country [folks]3 would lie,
  In the spring time, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding a ding;
Sweet lovers love the spring. ]4

[This carol they began that hour,
  With a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
How that [a life]5 was but a flower
  In the spring time, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding a ding;
Sweet lovers love the spring.]4

[And therefore take the present time]6
  [With]7 a hey, and a ho, and a hey nonino,
For love is crownéd with the prime
  In the spring time, the only pretty ring time,
When birds do sing, hey ding a ding a ding;
Sweet lovers love the spring.

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Available translations, adaptations or excerpts, and transliterations (if applicable):

View original text (without footnotes)
1 Morley: "cornfields"
2 omitted by Barton, Bush, and Morley, passim.
3 Delius, Dring: "folk"
4 In Dring and Parry, only the first and third lines are set.
5 sometimes "life"?
6 Barton, Morley : "Then, pretty lovers, take the time"
7 Bush: "And with"

Researcher for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator]