Translation by Johann Gottfried Herder (1744 - 1803)

Sweet William's ghost 
Language: English 
There came a ghost to Marg'ret's door,
With many a grievous groan,
And ay he tirled at the pin,
But answer made she none. 

Is that my father Philip,
Or is't my brother John?
Or is't my true love Willy
From Scotland new come home?

'Tis not thy father Philip,
Nor yet thy brother John,
But 'tis thy true love Willy
From Scotland new come home. 

O sweet Marg'ret!  O dear Marg'ret! 
I pray thee, speak to me,
Give me my faith and troth, Marg'ret,
As I gave it to thee. 

Thy faith and troth thou's never get,
Nor yet will I thee lend,
Till that thou come within thy bower,
And kiss my cheek and chin. 

If I shou'd come within thy bower, 
I am no earthly man;
And shou'd I kiss thy rosy lips,
Thy days will not be lang.

O sweet Marg'ret!  O dear Marg'ret!
I pray thee, speak to me,
Give me my faith and troth, Marg'ret,
As I gave it to thee.

Thy faith and troth thou's never get,
Nor yet will I thee lend,
Till you take me to yon kirk-yard,
And wed me with a ring. 

My bones are buried in yon kirk-yard,
Afar beyond the sea;
And it is but thy spirit, Marg'ret,
That's now speaking to thee. 

She stretched out her lily-white hand,
And for to do her best,
Hae there's your faith and troth, Willy,
God send your soul good rest. 

Now she has kilted her robes of green
A piece below her knee,
And a' the live-lang winter night
The dead corp followed she.

Is there any room at your head, Willy?
Or any room at your feet? 
Or any room at your side, Willy,
Wherein that I may creep?

There's no room at my head, Marg'ret,
There's no room at my feet;
There's no room at my side, Marg'ret,
My coffin's made so meet. 

Then up and crew the red red cock,
And up then crew the gray,
'Tis time, 'tis time, my dear Marg'ret,
That you were going away. 

No more the ghost to Marg'ret said,
But with a grievous groan,
Evanish'd in a cloud of mist,
And left her all alone. 

O stay, my only true love, stay,
The constant Marg'ret cry'd;
Wan grew her cheeks, she clos'd her een,
Stretch'd her soft limbs, and dy'd.

Confirmed with The Tea-Table Miscellany: or, a Collection of choice Songs, Scots and English, in four Volumes. The eleventh Edition, being the Compleatest and most Correct of any yet published. By Allan Ramsay [editor], London: A. Millar, 1750. Appears in volume IV, pages 324 - 325.


Authorship

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)

    [ None yet in the database ]

Settings in other languages, adaptations, or excerpts:


Researcher for this text: Melanie Trumbull

This text was added to the website: 2018-12-27
Line count: 64
Word count: 390

Zu Hannchens Thür, da kam ein Geist
Language: German (Deutsch)  after the English 
Zu Hannchens Thür, da kam ein Geist,
mit manchem Weh und Ach!
und drückt' am Schloß, und kehrt' am Schloß,
und ächzte traurig nach.

"Ist's, Vater Philipp! Der ist da?
Bist's, Bruder! Du , Johann?
Od'r ist's Wilhelm, mein Bräutigam!
Aus Schottland kommen an?"

"Dein Vater Philipp, der ist's nicht!
Dein Bruder nicht, Johann!
Es ist Wilhelm, dein Bräutigam,
aus Schottland kommen an!

Hör', süßes Hannchen, höre mich,
hör und willfahre mir!
Gieb mir zurück mein Wort und Treu,
das ich gegeben dir!"

"Dein Wort und Treu geb'ich dir nicht,
geb's nimmer wieder dir!
Bis du zu meiner Kammer kommst,
mit Liebeskuß zu mir!"

"Zu deiner Kammer soll ich ein,
und bin kein Mansch nicht mehr?
und küssen deinen Rosenmund?
So küß ich Tod dir her!

Nein, süßes Hannchen, höre mich,
hör und willfahre mir!
Gieb mir zurück mein Wort und Treu,
das ich gegeben dir!"

"Dein Wort und Treu geb' ich dir nicht,
geb's nimmer wieder dir! 
Bis du mich führst zur Kirch' hinan
mit Treuering dafür!" 

Und an der Kirche lieg' ich schon
und bin ein Todtenbein!
S'ist, süßes Hannchen, nur mein Geist,
der hier zu dir kommt ein!"

Ausstreckt sie ihre Lilienhand,
streckt bebend sie ihm zu:
"Da Wilhelm, hast du Wort und Treu,
und geh, und geh zu Ruh!"

Und schnell warf sie die Kleider an
und ging dem Geiste nach,
die ganze lange Winternacht
ging sie dem Geiste nach.

"Ist, Wilhelm, Raum noch, dir zu Haupt,
noch Raum zu Füssen dir?
Ist Raum zu deiner Seite noch,
so gib, so gib ihn mir!"  

"Zu Haupt und Fuß ist mir nicht Raum,
kein Raum zur Seite mir!
Mein Sarg ist, süßes Hannchen, schmal
das ich ihn gebe dir!"

Da kräht' der Hahn! Da schlug die Uhr!
Da brach der Morgen für!
"Ach, Hannchen, nun, nun kommt die Zeit,
zu scheiden weg von dir!"

Der Geist -- und mehr, mehr sprach er nicht,
und seufzte traurig drein,
und schwand in Nacht und Dunkel hin,
und sie, sie stand allein.

"Bleib, treue Liebe! Bleibe noch,
dein Mädchen rufet dich!"
Da brach ihr Blick! Ihr Leib, der sank,
und ihre Wang' erblich! --

K. Seckendorff sets stanzas 1-6, 9-11, 14-16

About the headline (FAQ)

Confirmed with Von deutscher Art und Kunst. Einige fliegende Blätter, Hamburg: Bey Bode, 1773. Appears in part I, "Auszug aus einem Briefwechsel über Ossian und die Lieder alter Völker," pages 49 - 50; also confirmed with Stimmen der Völker in Liedern, erster Theil, Wien, B. Ph. Bauer, 1818. Appears in Das dritte Buch. Nordwestliche Lieder, pages 219 - 222.

Note: Seckendorff's score has "gieng" instead of "ging" (stanza 11)


Authorship

Based on

Musical settings (art songs, Lieder, mélodies, (etc.), choral pieces, and other vocal works set to this text), listed by composer (not necessarily exhaustive)


Research team for this text: Emily Ezust [Administrator] , Ferdinando Albeggiani , Melanie Trumbull

This text was added to the website: 2007-05-23
Line count: 64
Word count: 352